Category Archives: National Park Service

MPNHA Photo Contest – $25 Prize

We know that you have some amazing photos, and now it’s time to share them! The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area is hosting a photo contest. It’s time to dust off the camera, phone, whichever you use to capture special moments and share some great pictures. You probably have some on your hard drive somewhere too!

To enter, users must upload their images to the MPNHA Facebook Page and submit a form (below) for each image that they enter into the contest.

Rules:

  • All photos must be be property of the entrant and an original work. If you are submitting for someone else, permission must be obtained before uploading the image.
  • All photos must be taken inside the boundaries of the MPNHA.
  • Photo enhancements are allowed.
  • The entry can be used on the MPNHA’s social media channels, website, etc. and will be credited to the entrant.
  • If people are included in the image, a release is required for entry.
  • All entrants must submit a short entry form in addition to uploading the image onto the MPNHA Facebook page.
  • The final date to enter is July 21, 2017 at midnight, mountain time.
  • The winner of the contest and $25 gift card to a retailer of their choice will be selected by the number of likes on their image. Ask your friends to vote for your image! In the event of a tie, the images with the same number of likes (loves, etc.) will be assigned a random number and then picked at random. The winner will be chosen and contacted on July 31, 2017.
  • There is no age limit to participants (under 13 years of age must have parental permission) or limit to the number of images that are allowed, as long as every image has been submitted into the form below.
  • Voting starts when you upload your image, so enter earlier for your best chance.
  • Those who work for the MPNHA are not eligible to enter/win.
  • Have fun.

Discovery Road Celebrates National Park Service Centennial

MPNHA-Press-Release1-Park-Service-Centennial

One hundred years. That’s a birthday to remember for the National Park Service and one Discovery Road hosts Maryda Nicole Gallo and James Nelson celebrate in “Precious Jewels in any Language” as they tag along with groups of international visitors who visit the five national parks in Utah: Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, Arches, Bryce and Zion.

In 1872, Congress established Yellowstone as the first national park and on August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act creating the National Park Service, an agency that now protects more than 380 parks, covering more than 83 million acres.

The national parks have been called “America’s best idea,” and in this Discovery Road episode, international visitors learn why.

The visitors hail from such faraway places as France, Germany, Austria, Italy, Vietnam, South Korea, Australia, and also from our next-door neighbor, Canada.

Without fail, every visitor is struck by the sheer size of the national parks. “Enormous,” “magnificent” and “majesty” are words that trip off their tongues as describe what they are seeing. It’s clear that each is affected by the beauty that surrounds them.

“It feeds my soul,” Sonja Groening from Austria says.

“It opens our minds and opens our eyes. It helps us understand other people and their thoughts,” one South Korean visitor says. The visitors enjoy the sights and sounds of the American West from the sweeping vistas to the open road and the characters they encounter along the way.

Near Zion National Park, the visitors meet Richard Budd of Kanab and get to explore his anti que, restored Ford pick-up truck. Many of the visitors have only seen the likes of it in old Hollywood movies.

In the episode, the hosts also visit with former volunteer ranger Black George Simmons, 82, who says he loved “giving people a sense of place one yeehaw at a time.

Serving as a backdrop to all the visiting and the storytelling in this episode of Discovery Road is the incredible open space of the parks protected by our forbearers for generations of Americans and their guests to enjoy.

“There is nothing so American as our national parks…. The fundamental idea behind the parks… is that the country belongs to the people, that it is in process of making for the enrichment of the lives of all of us.”   President Franklin D. Roosevelt

“Precious Jewels in any Language” will air on the Utah Education Network on Saturday, May 21 and Wednesday May 25. It is running on an ongoing basis on CentraCom , Fairview, Channel 10; Manti Telephone, Channel 3 and KTTA 8.1 Monroe, which serve central and south central Utah. It can also be found at the MPNHA website at htt p://www.mormonpioneerheritage.org/discovery-road-videos/

Interested viewers may find out how to access UEN-TV at htt p://www.uen.org/tv/translators/ Find Your Park

As part of the centennial celebrati on, the Nati onal Park Service has kicked off a movement called Find Your Park to inspire people to connect with, enjoy, and support America’s national parks. At FindYourPark.com visitors can virtually explore Utah’s (and other states’) national parks and fi nd out about special events such as Loa Elementary School students in Wayne County celebrati ng the nati onal park centennial in Capitol Reef National Park today, May 19, at the historic Fruita School house (built in 1896) with a graduati on/birthday ceremony. FindYourPark.com is just one of the many ways the National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial. Visit www.nps.gov to fi nd out more. ### The Mormon Pioneer Nati onal Heritage Area includes 400 miles of glorious scenic byways, a vast array of wildlife, the best of western living, catt le and sheep ranches, and colorful mountain vistas, all within a trip on Utah Heritage Highway 89.

Discovery Road Celebrates National Park Service Centennial

MPNHA-Press-Release1-Park-Service-Centennial

One hundred years. That’s a birthday to remember for the National Park Service and one Discovery Road hosts Maryda Nicole Gallo and James Nelson celebrate in “Precious Jewels in any Language” as they tag along with groups of international visitors who visit the five national parks in Utah: Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, Arches, Bryce and Zion.

In 1872, Congress established Yellowstone as the first national park and on August 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act creating the National Park Service, an agency that now protects more than 380 parks, covering more than 83 million acres.

The national parks have been called “America’s best idea,” and in this Discovery Road episode, international visitors learn why.

The visitors hail from such faraway places as France, Germany, Austria, Italy, Vietnam, South Korea, Australia, and also from our next-door neighbor, Canada.

Without fail, every visitor is struck by the sheer size of the national parks. “Enormous,” “magnificent” and “majesty” are words that trip off their tongues as describe what they are seeing. It’s clear that each is affected by the beauty that surrounds them.

“It feeds my soul,” Sonja Groening from Austria says.

“It opens our minds and opens our eyes. It helps us understand other people and their thoughts,” one South Korean visitor says. The visitors enjoy the sights and sounds of the American West from the sweeping vistas to the open road and the characters they encounter along the way.

Near Zion National Park, the visitors meet Richard Budd of Kanab and get to explore his antique, restored Ford pick-up truck. Many of the visitors have only seen the likes of it in old Hollywood movies.

In the episode, the hosts also visit with former volunteer ranger Black George Simmons, 82, who says he loved “giving people a sense of place one yeehaw at a time.

Serving as a backdrop to all the visiting and the storytelling in this episode of Discovery Road is the incredible open space of the parks protected by our forbearers for generations of Americans and their guests to enjoy.

“There is nothing so American as our national parks…. The fundamental idea behind the parks… is that the country belongs to the people, that it is in process of making for the enrichment of the lives of all of us.”   President Franklin D. Roosevelt

“Precious Jewels in any Language” will air on the Utah Education Network on Saturday, May 21 and Wednesday May 25. It is running on an ongoing basis on CentraCom , Fairview, Channel 10; Manti Telephone, Channel 3 and KTTA 8.1 Monroe, which serve central and south central Utah. It can also be found at the MPNHA website at

Discovery Road Television Show

Interested viewers may find out how to access UEN-TV at htt p://www.uen.org/tv/translators/

Find Your Park

As part of the centennial celebration, the National Park Service has kicked off a movement called Find Your Park to inspire people to connect with, enjoy, and support America’s national parks.

At FindYourPark.com visitors can virtually explore Utah’s (and other states’) national parks and find out about special events such as Loa Elementary School students in Wayne County celebrating the national park centennial in Capitol Reef National Park today, May 19, at the historic Fruita School house (built in 1896) with a graduation/birthday ceremony.

FindYourPark.com is just one of the many ways the National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial. Visit www.nps.gov to find out more.

The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area includes 400 miles of glorious scenic byways, a vast array of wildlife, the best of western living, cattle and sheep ranches, and colorful mountain vistas, all within a trip on Utah Heritage Highway 89.

Happy 100th Birthday National Park Service

National Park Service
National Park Service

On 25 August 2016 the National Park Service celebrates its 100th year serving the United States, her citizens, and the countless visitors to our great nation!

As a way to help citizens and visitors join in the celebration the National Parks will host free days for park goers.  The beginning of the second century stewardship, the National Park Service, will begin with engaging communities in recreation, teaching conservation, and educating others concerning historic preservation programs.

The National Park Service invites all to find your park to discover the programs in your very own back yard, or venture to the many National Parks outside your backyard.

The state of Utah has five National Parks, the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area boasts three of those National Parks:  Zion National ParkBryce Canyon National Park and Capitol Reef National Park.

Check with the National Park of your choosing to find your park’s free admission day as part of the Centennial Celebration.

Find your park, explore the great outdoors, take park tours to learn all there is to know about these great American historic places!  Go to National Park Service, to plan your visit.

Make sure and check out the National Park Service website to make the most of the centennial celebration!  Find Your Park, find some fun, find quality time to spend with your family, neighbors, friends, and spare an adventure during the Centennial Celebration of the National Park Service as a way to connect with other.

Railroad Resorts Bring Sevier County’s Railroad Past to Life

MPNHA-Press-Release-Sevier-Railroad

The Denver & Rio Grande Railroad is being resurrected in an unusual way in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area. Partners David Grow and George Jones of Environetics have built a caboose and railroad village at Big Rock Candy Mountain, north of Marysvale in Piute County. In February they received a 50-year lease of the old Denver and Rio Grande Depot from the city of Mt. Pleasant to build a similar resort there.

Jones, a retired railroad union executive with an interest in historic railroading, began collecting cabooses several years ago. About six years ago he approached Grow with the idea of turning them into a unique resort.

After several years of planning, last year the pair opened the Track 89 Caboose Village Resort at Big Rock Candy Mountain with three railroad cars. This year they have seven and next year they hope to have 10. The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area recently awarded the project a $25,000 grant for landscaping and parking.

Grow said it is unlikely the Mt. Pleasant facility will be open this season since major work needs to be done to prepare the site and move the railroad cars into place. He is very excited about the location, however.

“We’ve always loved that old depot and looked into moving it further down Highway 89 but found it was too expensive,” Grow said.

In 1977 the building was rescued from demolition by a group of local citizens who wanted to preserve it and had it moved to its present location from 500 West and Main.

The new location is ideal, Grow said. “It has great visibility, right on Highway 89. We will make sure that no lodging will block the beautiful view of the terrific old depot.” Grow said the Mt Pleasant site could eventually have as many as 15 rail cars.

He said they plan to incorporate several historic elements into the resort, but they have not yet determined if that will be in the setting of a small museum or as enhancements to the railroad cars themselves.

While some have suggested that the pair open a similar resort in Thistle in Utah County, Grow said that the Utah County planning department is not open to the idea.

“It would be like trying to push a river upstream,” he said.

MPNHA Director Monte Bona sees these two resorts as a first step to bringing about a railroad museum and interpretive center in the area, one of the goals of the MPNHA’s management plan.

“The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area reached the high threshold for national designation by articulating the thesis that Mormon colonization played a major role in the development of the West. The coming of the railroad era had a signifi cant impact that needs to be interpreted, displayed and conveyed as a crucial part of the Mormon country story,” he said.

The railroad first came to the Sevier Valley in 1893 when the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad expanded its line from Chester to Manti , connecting it with its Valley Line at Thistle Junction via Mt. Pleasant and from Manti to Marysvale.

At its peak, the line ferried passengers to Richfield where tour companies would meet the train at Marysvale and take tourists to Bryce Canyon and the Grand Canyon’s North Rim. For several decades it spurred economic growth in the area, especially in the livestock trade.

However, as automobiles grew in popularity, the railroad began to wane. In 1949, D&RGW dropped passenger service in the area. From then until the Thistle mudslide of 1982 shut down the line completely, the line primarily carried freight. Aft er the mudslide the D&RGW determined it would not be cost-effective to restore the line, which had been operating at a loss for decades.

Now, with the Environetics projects, railroad buff s and families will have a unique opportunity to experience a taste of the rich railroading history of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area.

For more information, contact or MPNHA Director Monte Bona at 801-699-5065 or David Grow at 801-375-9090.

###

The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area includes 400 miles of glorious scenic byways, a vast array of wildlife, the best of western living, cattle and sheep ranches, and colorful mountain vistas, all within a trip on Utah Heritage Highway 89

ANNOUNCING EVERY KID IN A PARK

every kid in a park

The Federal Land Management agencies, National Parks, National Park Service, Forest Service, Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the White House have joined together in a partnership to initiate the EVERY KID IN A PARK incentive.  This program is designed to give every fourth grader and their families to visit all our country’s natural treasures.  The history of our great country can engage each student to enjoy the beauty, culture, and enjoy the federal lands and waters free of charge.

This initiative began 01 September 2015 and ends on August 31, 2016.  The free pass allows free access to the national forests, national parks, and national wildlife refuges, and so much more.

nps_arrowhead_300The National Park Foundation which is the nation’s official charity for the National Parks has been raising funds to work with connecting the fourth graders of our nation to have free access to all of  public land and waters in America.  A division of the Foundation’s Open Outdoors for Kids program, is designed to remove stumbling blocks for our fourth graders admission into the wonderlands of our natural parks and water ways.   The Every Kid in a Park initiative has been designed for students in under served and urban communities.  Due to the schools wide cutbacks in funding for grants for fields trips, the strategic funding will hopefully provide a learning experience for all fourth graders and their families.

Bryce Canyon National Park
Bryce Canyon National Park

The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area is the only Federally recognized Heritage Area with three National Parks.

These are: Bryce Canyon National Park: Boulder Loop District

Sunset from the Sunset Point area at Capitol Reef Ray Mathis/NPS
Sunset from the Sunset Point area at Capitol Reef
Ray Mathis/NPS

Capitol Reef National Park in the Boulder Loop District

double rainbow

Zion National Park: Under the Rim District.

Zion National Park
Zion National Park

Little Hollywood Shootout Quick

http://www.onlyinyourstate.com/utah/terrifying-southern-ut-road-trip/

Kelly Stowell <stowell@kanab.net> of the Utah Film Commission
Date: Thu, Feb 25, 2016 at 3:55 PM
Subject: Little Hollywood Shootout

Quick Turn Around Film Competition Kicks Off

March 16, 2016 at High Noon in Kanab

Little Hollywood Shootout Quick Turn Around Film Competition

Kicks Off March 16, 2016 at High Noon in Kanab During the Shamrocks and Redrocks Festival

KANAB, Utah – The unmistakable landscape found in the Kanab area has made this part of southern Utah a favorite destination for filmmakers since the 1920’s. In line with this great filmmaking tradition, the annual “Little Hollywood Shootout,” kicks off at the historic Parry Lodge in Kanab, Utah on Wednesday, March 16, 2016. The “shootout” is a quick-turnaround film challenge requiring filmmakers to produce a short film with Kanab area locations as the backdrop.kanab-700x467

At high noon on March 16, 2016 film production requirements including locations and a theme will be revealed to participants. Competitors will then have 49.5 hours to write, direct, edit, and complete a five-minute film. Film submissions are due at 1:30 pm on Friday, March 18, 2016 either in person or online. The shootout films will then be premiered at a community screening and awards ceremony in the evening on Saturday, March 19, 2016 at the Crescent Moon Theater during the “Redrocks and Shamrocks” festival in Kanab.

John Wayne and John Ford's favorite place to film westerns.
John Wayne and John Ford’s favorite place to film westerns.

“The shootout is the thunder dome of quick turnaround film challenges, and in addition to building on the film heritage of southern Utah, the competition provides aspiring filmmakers an opportunity to produce a film in the same place where film legends like John Ford and Clint Eastwood also worked,” explained Kane County Film Commissioner, Kelly Stowell, one of the organizers and founder of the event. “Coupled with the Shamrocks and Redrocks festival, Kanab is the place to be for the Saint Patrick’s day weekend. We have a great event planned this year and are looking forward to a fun filled weekend,” commented Stowell.

john wayne fort apache

 

 

Prospective filmmakers of all ages from beginners to veterans are invited to take part in the challenge. Two divisions are available for participants with one category intended for novice filmmakers of all ages looking to gain experience and the other division is designed for competitors who have experience with film production. Primary filming locations are required to take place in Kane County, but editing and post-production can take place at the participants desired location.

 

Films are due at 1:30 pm on Friday, March 18, 2016 and can be turned in through a revealed online medium or films can be submitted in person back at the Parry Lodge at the time of the deadline.Parry Lodge

Sponsors of the event include AT&T, Kane County Office of Tourism and Film Commission, Center for Education, Business, and the Arts, Kanab City, and the Utah Film Commission. “We appreciate our sponsors and this event would not be possible without their tremendous contributions to the shootout,” said Stowell.

Cresent Moon TheaterFestivities of the Little Hollywood Shootout conclude with film premiers and awards ceremony taking place at Kanab’s Crescent Moon Theater, showcasing submitted films on the evening of Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 7:00 pm. Community members and participants are strongly encouraged and invited to attend.

For more information about the Little Hollywood Shootout or to register your team, visit www.littlehollywoodshootout.org or call 4358990443.

For more information about “Shamrocks and Redrocks” visit http://www.visitsouthernutah.com/Shamrocks_and_Redrocks_site

 

Pictured: Filmmakers are presented with money, awards, and awesome trophies at the 2015 Little Hollywood Shootout at the Crescent Moon Theater in Kanab.

Jenna Bush Hager and mom Laura Bush to write children’s book together

Laura and Jenna Bush

“I’m thrilled to announce that my daughter, Jenna Bush Hager, and I are writing another children’s book, OUR GREAT BIG BACKYARD. To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, OUR GREAT BIG BACKYARD will show kids all our National Parks have to offer. Illustrated by Jacqueline Rogers, OUR GREAT BIG BACKYARD will be published in May 2016, and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the National Park Foundation“, stated Laura Bush

 TODAY correspondent Ree Hines announced that Jenna Bush Hager and her mom, former first lady Laura Bush, are teaming up to co-write their second children’s book together.

According to the Associated Press, in May 2016, Harper Collins will publish “Our Great Big Backyard,” a new picture book that focuses on one young girl who learns to really see what’s around her.

Jane, the character at the heart of the story, embarks on a road trip with her family to see the national parks, and soon she’s “paying attention to the majestic sights and spending less time looking at her screen.”

The subject matter is near and dear to both of the authors. Jenna is now a mother to two daughters — 2-year-old Mila and 2-month-old Poppy — herself. And Laura Bush serves as an honorary co-chairwoman, alongside current First Lady Michelle Obama, for the National Park Service centennial celebration next year.

“I’ve hiked with childhood friends in the parks for years,” Laura Bush said in a statement given to the Associated Press. “Jenna accompanied me on a float trip through the Grand Canyon and rode a horse for the first time when she was 3 near the Big Bend National Park. I want all children to go outside, play in nature, and explore America’s magnificent sites with their families.”

Ree Hines, Today

5 Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area Towns are Recognized

Move to These 14 Towns in Utah if You Want to Get Away From it All

has listed 5 Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area Towns.  This is a great honor to be recognized, of course Director, Monte Bona sates that, “I think that each one of our communities should be recognized as outstanding towns to raise your child or retire. These are just wonderful areas with even better citizens.”

If you live in one of Utah’s larger cities, you might dream of moving somewhere far away from other people. Our state has lots of small, rural towns that offer a much quieter, peaceful existence. Of course, job opportunities, shopping and entertainment are much harder to come by in these little towns. But that’s the point, isn’t it?

PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND THE MORMONS SHARE A RICH HISTORY

Bryon C. Andreason author of Looking For Lincoln in Illinois series has a new addition to his collection with his newly published book, Looking For Lincoln In Illinois; Lincoln And Mormon Country .  This new book introduces the rich history of the early Mormon leaders and Abraham Lincoln.  This edition contains over thirty amazing stories that connect President Lincoln with the Mormon community and members.

Lincoln and Mormon Country by Bryon C. Andreasen
Lincoln and Mormon Country by Bryon C. Andreasen

It is an honor for the Mormons and the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area to be recognized by the Looking for Lincoln Heritage Coalition and the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area with the publication of Andreason’s latest addition to his popular series.

Andreason amply tells of the great generation of the nineteenth century pioneers and of the Latter-day Saints,  in Nauvoo to the state capital of Springfield.  Included in this publication are maps, historic photos, Mormon expeditions, descriptive battles, interesting events of his travels, the now famous inns in which Lincoln visited.   Also included in the edition are Brigham Young and various Mormon apostles of the time.
The book also includes colorful and engaging looks at key figures such as Brigham Young, various Mormon apostles, and more. Anyone inspired by Lincoln, as well as Mormon and Illinois history enthusiasts, will appreciate this look back at a long-past, but not forgotten, landscape.

 

Those with any interest in the history of the nineteenth century history, Abraham Lincoln, and Mormon history will sure be pleased with his latest publication.

Legends, Lore, & True Tales in Mormon Country Edited by Monte Bona
Legends, Lore, & True Tales in Mormon Country Edited by Monte Bona

There is another interest that the Looking For Lincoln and the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area have in common, it is the recently published book Legends, Lore& True Tales In Mormon Country.  This insightful book was edited by Monte Bona, Director of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area.

It contains contributions from authors Christian Probasco, Steven J. Clark, Eileen Hallet Stone, James Nelson, Jack C. Billings, Ed Meyer, Jack Monnet, Jason Friedman, and Shirley Bahlmann. These gifted authors have brought to life the exciting life and times in the Mormon Country.

Interesting and beloved stories of Brigham Young, Hiram Bebee, Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid, Maude Adams, Chief Walkara, Chief Black Hawk , and Zane Grey’s ghost and numerous other stories. This book is a wonderful addition to your library, our family truly enjoys learning between myth or fact in our new home.

These books are a great Christmas gift for all that have an interest in the Mormon Country, and in President Abraham Lincoln.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area “Discovery Road” to air on UEN

MPNHA-Press-Release-Discovery-Road-Hi-Ways-and-Byways

Linda Petersen

Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

801-554-7513

Email: linda@bpmedia.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Oct. 2, 2015

Utah Education Network TV (UEN) will begin airing “Discovery Road,” a series that grew out of a desire to tell the stories of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area and its people, on Saturday, Oct. 10 at 6 p.m. UEN broadcasts on Channel 9 in most parts of Utah.

Conceived in 2012, “Discovery Road” is an ongoing series of half hour shows featuring a ‘55 Pontiac affectionately named “Love Me Tender,” which hosts James Nelson and Maryda Nicole Gallo drive along U.S. Highway 89, All-American Road State Route 12 and Scenic Byway State Route 24.

Using music, storytellers and the characters in the communities along the way, the hosts present the history, scenery and culture of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area in an entertaining and educational manner. “

The whole idea behind the show is to get people to do what they used to do on Sunday afternoons — take a drive,” said MPNHA Executive Director Monte Bona.

UEN-TV Program Manager Kyle Anderson said “Discovery Road” is a great fit for the station. “At UEN our main purpose is to reach to the statewide community,” he said. “Discovery Road is a good local resource with a lot of good stories about Utah and Utah history. It’s very well done and entertaining.”

James Nelson and M. Nicole Gallo driving “Love Me Tender”, a ‘55 Pontiac, outside Spring City on Heritage Day.

— 2 —

The show’s times lot at 6 p.m. on Saturdays is great for people who are coming in from the outdoors and want to be both educated and entertained, Anderson said.

October schedule: Oct 10, 6 p.m. “Don’t Let Them Be Forgotten”

This episode tracks the Blackham family, who were barely subsisting working in the cotton mills of England’s industrial revolution in the latter 1800s, to joining the LDS church and migrating to Sanpete County. They paved the way for current-day descendents, who are farmers, att orneys, business leaders, musicians, teachers, and politi cians, including present-day mayors of two Sanpete cities.

Oct 17, 6 p.m. “Music Is the Reason”

Welsh pioneers to Zion were sent to Sanpete County to develop a “Coal Bed” (the original name of Wales Town in Sanpete County), bringing with them their native gift of music. The coal ran out, but these musical miners produced both the world-famous Mormon Tabernacle Choir and the Osmond Family, to name just two.

Oct 24, 6 p.m. “The Heritage Experience”

A busload of travel writers heads north from Zion’s National Park along Heritage Highway 89, visiting historic stops along the way, including Mom’s Café in Salina and Clarion, the short-lived Jewish settlement west of Centerfield.

Oct 31, 6 p.m. “Mormon Trail: Black Experience”

Returned Mormon missionary Marcus Ewell discovers his family history includes an ancestor who served in the Mormon Batt alion and another who traveled the Mormon trail. The Discovery Road crew visits Marti ns Cove, Winter Quarters and many other places on their journey to the past. As the visit to yesterday plays out along the trail, a mystery unfolds about who might have been with the Ewell family every step of the way.

**Upcoming shows:

Nov. 7 Mormon Trail – The Forgotten Ones

Nov. 14 Mormon Trail – The Disabled Ones

Nov. 21 Nati ve Americans and Sacred Water

Nov. 28 Filmmakers Shootout in Kane County

Dec. 5 Garfi eld County*

Dec. 12 Scandinavian Show*

Dec. 19 The Dreams I Left Behind* Merrill Osmond joins “Discovery Road” as a guest in “Music is the Reason.”

— 3 —

After airing on Saturdays, each show will air again at noon the following Wednesday.

“Wherever we go while producing Discovery Road episodes people ask where they might be able to see the shows. When we tell them UEN, they nod approval and tell us that’s a place for good programming. We agree. The programming is diverse, educati onal and entertaining. We are delighted to be a part of it,” said Discovery Road Co-host Maryda Nicole Gallo.

In addition to airing on UEN, “Discovery Road” is running on several stations in central and southern Utah, including CentraCom Interactive’s Channel 10, Manti Telecommunications’ Channel 3 and KTTA in Monroe.

Interested viewers may find out how to access UEN-TV at http://www.uen.org/tv/translators/

*December programming is tentative as Discovery Road has several more episodes in production which may take the place of currently scheduled shows.

** Descriptions of these episodes may be found on the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area, www.mormonpioneerheritage.org/discovery-road-videos.

###

About the MPNHA:

The Mormon Pioneer Heritage Area is a federally designated area of central and southern Utah running along the beautiful and historic U.S. Highway 89 — including the All-American Road Utah State Route 12, and Capitol Reef Scenic Byway Utah State Route 24, which both intersect with U.S. 89 and together form the MPNHA’s Boulder Loop. The area includes the counties of Sanpete, Sevier, Piute, Wayne, Garfield and Kane.

About UEN: The Utah Education Network was established more than 20 years ago by the Utah State Legislature to coordinate telecommunications technology for public and higher education. UEN infrastructure serves public education, higher education, applied technology, libraries, government, and other public entities by providing networking, application and support services, serving a vital role in anticipating and meeting the educational needs of our state.

Legends, Lore and True Tales in Mormon Country (American Legends) By Monte Bona

 

legends lore and true tales in mormon country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monte Bona, along with the collaborative efforts of talented professionals have given us an authentic view of those brave men, women and children who left their homes, family, wealth, and country to establish the communities in South Central Utah.

The powerful stories of the early settlers in the region that is now identified by the Congressional designation as the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area, are touching, informative, and compelling

These pioneers certainly left a legacy that illustrates a structure that was steeped in  codes of conduct, traditions, and  principles that everyone embraced for the sole purpose of succeeding in a somewhat hostile environment.  Their stories come to life as you read of their inventiveness, cooperation,  conscientiousness, and pure resilience.     You will also be moved stories of with miracles that occurred..

Many may be interested to learn that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, or Mormons were not the only secular group that assisted with the settling  of Utah.   Jewish settlements, and contributions of a Presbyterian Minister, were instrumental.   There were great sacrifices, large doses of humility, and traditional morals that were all combined to make their efforts a true success.

I have a great appreciation for the time intensive work completed by Monte Bona that has gone into producing Legends, Lore and True Tales in Mormon Country (American Legends).  It is commendable that such an undertaking has been made to tell their stories. What a great job he has done!

The pictures are an added bonus, they help to recreate the trials, tribulations and the triumphs of  the early pioneers.  Mr. Bona has done a tremendous job in compiling this must have book for those who seek to find their family history, and a great resource for future generations.  Without a doubt this is a book that you will read, reread, share, and  retell the stories, legends, lore and true tales to everyone.  I highly recommend this book to all who seek the true tales in Mormon Country.

 

Bryce Canyon National Park, The Wonder of the “Hoodoos”

Bryce Canyon is another great National Park that has beauty beyond description, come experience the wonder during National Park Week.

Bryce Canyon Natural Bridge Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com
Bryce Canyon Natural Bridge Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com

Ebenezer Bryce, a Mormon pioneer assisted in the settlement of southwestern Utah and northern Arizona.  He came to the area in 1875 to harvest timber and live.  He settled behind what is now Bryce Canyon National Park, located in the southwestern part of the state of Utah.  His neighbors would call the canyon behind his home “Bryce’s Canyon.”  In 1928 it was given the designation of a state park. Bryce Canyon National Park is a small park, 56 square miles, by the standards of the National Parks.Bryce Canyon in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

What is famous about Bryce Canyon?

Bryce Canyon, with its acclaimed geology, countless colors of varying hues, and amphitheaters shaped as horseshoes, cut out the eastern edge of  the Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah.    With the power of nature the rainwater and the frost moisture dissolved to shape and affect the color of the limestone to create various shapes of “hoodoos,” slot canyons, windows, spires, and fins.  The miraculous natural tinting of the stones and a power that is unexplanable, has colored and arranged capriciously the rocks to have created a wonderland landscape of mazes.  Those that have taken a walk along this wonderland have experienced a memorable and exciting memory.

Bryce Canyon National Park Photo Courtesy of Kreig Rasmussen Photograpy
Bryce Canyon National Park Photo Courtesy of Kreig Rasmussen Photograpy

With the meadows located in the high elevations of the plateau, the foliage is abundant  and the wildlife flourishes.  The plateau has also been deemed as one of the world’s best air quality.  The rim affords a panoramic view of approximately 200 miles in a three state radius.  It is also known as one of the best stargazing locations due to a very small light sources.

Bryce Canyon Forest Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com
Bryce Canyon Forest Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com

The marvel of the “hoodoos” were described by the Paiutes as the “Legend People” that were turned to stone by Coyote.  The geological term for “hoodoo” is a pillar of rock, usually fantastic shape, left by erosion.  It is also known that “hoodoo” means to cast a spell.

Fairyland Point Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com
Fairyland Point Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com

Within the Bryce Canyon National Park, erosion has been created with the fun, whimsical  “hoodoos.”  Geologists have an answer, they state that millions of years ago whatever forces were present on Mother Earth, moved these cute enormous objects that were named Aquarius and Paunsaugunt Plateaus.  Today, the rock layers of the Aquarius now reach 2,000 feet above the Paunsaugunt’s same layers.

Aquarius Plateau in Bryce Canyon National Park Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service
Aquarius Plateau in Bryce Canyon National Park Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

The ancient rivers’ flow took to carving out the tops and formed the edges of the large rocks.  Layers were removed and this brought about the chiseling and sculpted forms.  This brought about the creation of the Paria Valley and then later caused the widening of the plateaus.

Thor's Hammer Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com
Thor’s Hammer Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com

No matter what the cause, these wondrous shapes have certainly cast their spell for all that have ever visited, and those that wish to visit.

Hiking trail to Mossy Cave Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com
Hiking trail to Mossy Cave Photo Courtesy of Pam Burt and Utah.com

Come experience the beauty and wonder of this magnificent landscape that only exists in Bryce Canyon National Park.

Share your favorite story and photos, upload your photos on your social media #findyourpark #findyourstory.

“ONE OF THE NATURAL WONDERS OF THE WORLD” ZION NATIONAL PARK

Natural Wonders of the World: America’s top five National Parks

Zion National Park Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service
Zion National Park Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

There is never a better time to begin your Zion National Park Adventure.  As one of the Natural Wonders of the World: America’s top five National Parks; it is on many lists of must see places, including National Geographic Top Ten National Park Landmarks.  There are numerous reasons to visit this world wonder and all of them will fascinate the imagination and leave you breathless at the magnificent views and experience in the park.

Zion National Park Visitors Center Photo Courtesy of National Park Service
Zion National Park Visitors Center Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

Zion Canyon Visitor Center:

Here you will get maps and permits you will need for your exploration of the canyon. Rangers are available to assist you and answer any questions  you may have. There are two  main campgrounds,  gift shops, restaurants, and other attractions.  Here you will find The Watchman trail head.  The towering Watchman, stands some 2500ft/1995m above the canyon floor to keep watch over and protect the canyon.

Zion Museum:

You will certainly want to visit the Zion Museum to learn the creation of Zion Canyon.  Millions of years of erosion left these magnificent Navajo sandstone towers and cliffs. Zion Canyon is but one of the steps in the Grand Staircase that begins at the Grand Canyon and ends at Bryce Canyon.

Court of the Patriarchs Zion National Park
Court of the Patriarchs Zion National Park

Court of the Patriarchs:

With just a short hike, you will come to the base of three sandstone monoliths.  These are named after the ancient old testament patriarchs: Abraham, Issac, and Jacob. From here you can access the Sand Bench Trail, which will take you along the Virgin River to the Zion Lodge.

Zion Lodge Photo Courtesy of the Zion Lodge
Zion Lodge Photo Courtesy of the Zion Lodge

Zion Lodge:

The Zion Lodge lies in the heart of Zion Canyon.  Here you will find gift shops and food service. 

Upper Emerald Pools NPhoto Courtesy of National Park Servide
Upper Emerald Pools Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

Emerald Pools Trailhead:

The trail head to the three Emerald Pools begins at the Zion Lodge.  You can see the reflection of the surrounding cliffs as you look across these crystal clear pools.

 

Angels Landing Photo Courtesy of National Park Servide
Angels Landing Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

The Grotto- Angels Landing & West Rim Trailhead:

One of the most spectacular hikes in Zion,  begins here.  This hike up to Angels Landing is an experience that stops those faint hearted and with a fear of heights.  The 2,000 foot shear cliffs that drop off from both sides of the narrow trail, require a good deal of steal in the bravery department, as you approach the top.  Although this is a psychological and physical test, the view of the canyon floor from the heights above  is certainly well worth the hike.

Weeping Rock Photo Courtesy of National Park Servide
Weeping Rock Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

Weeping Rock- Observation Point Trailhead:

An amazing sight is that of the porous Navajo sandstone monoliths.  Water pervades down through the sandstone and as it reaches impermeable layers that allow the water to flow horizontal until it seeps to the face of the cliffs.  Thus is the case of the Weeping Rock.

Big Bend Photo Courtesy of National Park Servide
Big Bend Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

Big Bend – The Organ:

Big Bend will  have you standing at the base of a 2,000ft/6,010m shear cliff on the north side of Angels Landing.   A 1,100ft Monolith “Organ” (resembling a pipe organ) stands here at the edge of the Virgin River.

Temple of Sinawava Photo Courtesy of National Park Servide
Temple of Sinawava Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

Temple of Sinawava- Riverside Walk-

Is the end of the canyon road, and the beginning of the Riverside trail.  It winds along the banks of the Virgin River which  ends at “The Narrows.”

The Narrows Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service
The Narrows Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

The Narrows

Is a one way 16 mile hike through the narrow canyons of the Virgin River.  The towering steep cliffs over 1,000 feet high surround you.

The Great White Throne Photo Courtesy of National Park Servide
The Great White Throne Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

The Riverside Trail

will allow you to go as far as you wish.  The many famous Zion Park photographs are taken in Zion Canyon.  These include the Patriarchs, the Great White Throne, and scenes along the Virgin River.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor Activities include:

  • Biking
  • Camping
  • Canyoneer
  • Climbing
  • Golf
  • Hiking
  • Horseback Riding
  • Off Road / ATV
  • Ski
  • Snowboarding

Share your favorite story and photos, upload your photos on your social media #findyourpark #findyourstory.

CAPITOL REEF NATIONAL PARK

Sunset from the Sunset Point area at Capitol Reef Ray Mathis/NPS
Sunset from the Sunset Point area at Capitol Reef
Ray Mathis/NPS

Capitol Reef National Park, in the Boulder Loop District of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area is all that one would expect from a visit.  There is an abundance of  history of the Fremont People, the earliest dwellers who were farmers and hunters, dating back to 700 AD.  The area being fertile land due to the lakes and streams made for abundant hunting and fishing, and rich farmland.

Their heritage relates them to the Ancestral Puebloans but they disappeared from the area about 1250 AD.  Fortunately, these Native Americans left their records on the rock and the canyon walls.

Native Americans and Sacred Water Discovery Road
Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the 1600’s the Paiute Indians took over the lands.  Here the Paiute’s enjoyed all the riches that the area possessed.  In the 1800’s the first pioneers located this rich land and began to establish a settlement.  By 1872, the territory was no longer an uncharted area, it had been officially documented and explored

Around the 1920’s Joseph S. Hickman and Ephraim Portman wanted to preserve the natural beauty of the area so they came together to create the “Wayne Wonderland Club” to preserve and promote the area.

Fruita, Utah in 1931
Fruita, Utah in 1931

Hickman was elected to the Utah State legislature, and 16 acres in the Fruita township were designated to the status of a Utah State Park.  In 1937 it reached the status as a national monument by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.  It received its national park status in 1971 under the Richard M. Nixon Presidency.

Pinyon
Pinyon Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

Capitol Reef National Park supports  an assortment of distinctive ecosystems.  The 900 species of flora and fauna, the animals, the geology, and the environmental features make the park so diverse.

Mountain Lion Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service
Mountain Lion Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

Most popular sites and unique formations:

The Waterpocket Fold is the most distinguishing feature in the park, a 100-mile long classic monocline uplifted 7000 feet on the west side.

Waterpocket Fold aerial view Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service
Waterpocket Fold aerial view Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

Capitol Dome is a massive white sandstone formation that resembles the U.S. Capitol building. The park was partly named for this landmark.

Chimney Rock is a towering 400-foot-tall sandstone pillar, located three miles west of the visitor center off Highway 24 and accessible via a short hiking trail.

Hickman Bridge is a huge natural arch spanning 133 feet wide and 125 feet tall. The arch is named after Joseph S. Hickman, an early advocate for Capitol Reef’s preservation.

The Castle Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service
The Castle Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

The Castle, an impressive craggy sandstone formation visible from Highway 24.

Cassidy Arch, a pink Kayenta sandstone arch spanning 50 feet, above the Grand Wash. Accessible by a moderate three-mile round trip hike.

The Bentonite Hills are round formations with a checkerboard facade, located 9 miles from River Ford.

Bentonie Hills Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service
Bentonie Hills Photo Courtesy of the National Park Service

Temple of the Sun, Temple of the Moon and The Walls of Jericho are some of the massive monoliths (standing 400 to 500 feet high) located in the scenic Cathedral Valley.

Gypsum Sinkhole, is a 200-foot deep sinkhole, 50 feet in diameter, near the Cathedral Valley Junction.

Share your favorite story and photos invite upload photos on your social media  #findyourpark #findyourstory

Check out the National Park Service plan your visit to get the most of your experience.

 

National Park Week

Bryce Canyon in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage AreaApril 18, 2015 is the kick off of National Park Week.  The National Park Service announces that it has again partnered with the National Park Foundation for National Park Week.  This Presidentally acclaimed celebration of the United States’ national heritage offers free admission to all National Parks on opening weekend, the 18th and 19th of April, 2015.

In the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area there are three National Parks; Bryce Canyon National Park, Capitol Reef National Park, and Zion’s National Park.  The National Park Service in conjunction with the state of Utah, and the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area invite you to visit one of these spectacular sites.

Kreig Rasmussen Photography http://www.kreigrasmussenphoto.com/bryce-canyon-2/
Kreig Rasmussen Photography http://www.kreigrasmussenphoto.com/bryce-canyon-2/

Your amazing first view of Bryce Canyon National Park offers the wonder of the numerous rows of the majestic pine trees that will obscure the vibrant colors and the splendor of  the canyon.  Once visitors reach the rim, a magnificent array of colors spring forth, giving a spectacular view particularly during daybreak and sunset.  Take a 37 mile round trip to the top 15 most visited viewpoints of Bryce Canyon.

Photo Courtesy of National Park Service
Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

Capitol Reef National Park, in the Boulder Loop District of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area is all that one would expect from a National Park.  The magnificent scenery of the sandstone spires and monoliths, the twisting, winding canyons, and the enormous domes have been fascinating visitors since its designation as a national park in 1937 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Photo Courtesy of National Park Service
Photo Courtesy of National Park Service

Utah’s first designated National Park  was Zion National Park.  Here you will discover incredible views, renowned hiking trails such as Angels Landing, The Narrows, and Subway, will give countless experiences.  The park itself has a sense of reverence which many visitors recognize much like the Native Americans who regarded Zion as sacred.

Visit one of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area Parks and remember to share your experience, favorite story and photos on your social media with #findyourpark #findyourstory.

 

First Annual Amazing Earthfest

DATE 05/09/2007 7:15 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

First Annual Amazing Earthfest

The First Annual Amazing Earthfest in “Dramatic” Southern UtahSouthern Utah’s Kane County

CONTACT: Cowboy Ted Hallisey 435-899-1102 Cowboyted8@aol.com

WEBSITE: www.amazingearthfest.com  or www.kaneutah.com
Alternate Contact/Coordinator: Rich Csenge 207-729-5825, jiw@gwi.net 

KANAB, Utah—Families and individuals from all fifty states and internationally are invited to celebrate the First Annual Amazing Earthfest Celebration, happening May 21-26, 2007 in Kanab, Utah. Here travelers will discover, learn from and celebrate national and state parks, national forests and public lands of the Colorado plateau located in Utah and Arizona.

Kanab plans to establish, host and support this broadly inclusive event each year in May, fostering education, scientific discovery and understanding, plus recreation and entertainment. The ultimate goal is to attract visitors from across the nation and abroad to Kane County, for the purpose of experiencing the National Parks and Public Lands that were recently described by Sunset Magazine as “dramatic.”

Visitors can choose from a wide variety of scheduled activities including: lectures and demonstrations, scientific and educational symposia, Native American and Pioneer cultural programs, guided backcountry trips, expeditions and musical performances. Additional activities include: exhibitions of visual arts, painting, sculpture, hand-made crafts, culinary delights and Pioneer history.

Scientific Presentations – Visiting scholars, scientists and staff from major regional educational institutions and the public land managing agencies will be invited to present on geology, ecology, biology, paleontology and archaeology, as well as land and resource management techniques. Programs are planned for a host of visitor centers in the area, as well as guided site visits and expeditions to remote locations in the region. Activities, exhibits, lectures and demonstrations will be designed to educate and inform local residents and visitors about the scientific discovery, study, history and natural wonders of Southern Utah and the Arizona Strip.

Creative Arts & Entertainment – Artists, musicians and storytellers will be on-hand to express their experience of the history, life and culture of the Intermountain West, through exhibitions, concerts and presentations, including competitions for prizes. Pioneer history and culinary arts will round out visitors’ enjoyment and the Tribe of the Colorado Plateau has been invited to participate.

Outdoor Recreation – Campers, hikers, horseback riders, cyclists, mountain bikers, climbers, road tourists and off-road vehicle enthusiasts are invited to make Southern Utah & Northern Arizona their destination for this springtime event; to engage in a favorite sport, while enjoying the welcoming hospitality of area service providers. OHVs are welcome on designated routes and trails.

Want a special treat? Hit the Arizona Strip and learn about the Condor Release Program.

Tentative Amazing Earthfest Participants ~ 2007

  • Best Friends Animal Society – bird display on site in Angel Canyon
  • Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park – nature walks
  • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area – Lake Powell events
  • Grand Canyon National Park – North Rim
  • Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument – Dinosaur talks and exhibits
  • Thunderbird Foundation for the Arts – Maynard Dixon Home
  • Pipe Spring National Monument – Native American and Pioneer food and lifestyle recreations & sampling

Also: Bryce Canyon National Park, Cedar Breaks National Monument, Dixie National Forest, East Zion Tourism Council, Kaibab National Forest, Kanab City, Kane County Office of Tourism, Kodachrome Basin State Park, Mormon Pioneer Heritage Highway, Page-Lake Powell, Utah Office of Tourism, and Zion National Park.

For more information on First Annual Amazing Earthfest Celebration please call Cowboy Ted Hallisey-435-899-1102 or Rich Csenge 207-729-5825.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

State Bald Eagle Day Set for Feb. 4 in Sanpete County Annual Event to be Held in Fountain Green.

DATE 1/06/2006
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Heritage Council on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

State Bald Eagle Day Set for Feb. 4 in Sanpete County Annual Event to be Held in Fountain Green.

Circle Feb. 4 on your calendar. It’s the state Division of Wildlife Resource’s annual Bald Eagle Day and Sanpete County’s visitors and residents will get a chance to see the magnificent birds their natural habitat.The free public event will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.at the Fountain Green State Fish Hatchery, located one mile north of Fountain Green. A sign will be posted along the main roadways directing people to an access road that leads to the hatchery. Similar events are being held throughout the state the same day.

“It’s the best place in the region to see bald eagles,” Scott Root, information manager for the Division of Wildlife Resource’s Central Region, says of the Fountain Green site. “There is one tree in particular there where we have seen 40 or more bald eagles at a time.”

Root will be at the hatchery throughout the day and there will also be displays, pamphlets and other materials about bald eagles available. Spotting scopes will also be set up at each viewing site, and people available to help viewers spot eagles and to answer any questions. Those interested in photographing eagles should have a telephoto lens, as some of the eagles may be some distance from the viewing areas.

“We’ll also give people maps of places nearby that they can drive to and observe eagles,” he says.

People can expect to see eagles during the late morning and early afternoon but not as many as just before sundown, when eagles “go to roost” for the evening. At most of the sites, the best time to see the greatest number of eagles is usually from 2 to 4 p.m.

The state division started Bald Eagle Day in 1990 as a way to introduce people to Utah’s wildlife. Since then, it has grown into Utah’s most well-attended and enjoyed wildlife-viewing event.

“This day is one of my favorite parts of my job,”

Root says, adding a lot of people come back year after year. “We give out Bald Eagle Day buttons, and it’s a big deal to some people. They drive out just to get the new button. We also get a lot of people from the larger cities who like to drive out to the country for the day. There are also a lot of first-timers, and those are my favorite people. There is so much for them to learn about the birds.”

For example, Root says a lot of people don’t know that bald eagles don’t develop their trademark white heads and tails until they are four to five years of age. As well, many are surprised by the birds’ eating habits. “They are not proud animals,” Root says with a laugh. “If there is a pond with fish, they will swoop down to get one, but they are also happy to feed on dead sheep, rabbit or deer.”

Bald eagles typically winter in Utah, gathering in regions throughout the state from about November to March. “February seems to be the peak time,” Root says. “After March, they tend to fly on to Alaska or to the Northwest Territories.”

For more information about Bald Eagle Day, call Scott Root at 801-491-5656.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Fall Brings Rainbow of Color to Sanpete County, U.S. Highway 89

DATE 09/24/2005 9:12 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Fall Brings Rainbow of Color to Sanpete County, U.S. Highway 89

Fall has arrived and the canyons, parks, forests and landscapes in Sanpete County and along historical U.S. Highway 89 are awash in color. There are vivid shades of orange, red, and gold, making the area a must-see for anyone wanting to tour the state’s seasonal, sensational sites.

In Sanpete County, be sure to drive along Skyline Drive, which is known as a bird watcher’s paradise with eagle and hawks circling overhead, and through the Manti La-Sal National Forest. The forest, in addition to boasting a spectacular display of color, offers mountain climbing and hiking trails. The Wasatch Plateau section of the Manti-La Sal Forest also contains a variety of recreation trails for foot, horse, and/or mountain biking.

As well, the northern, Manti-La Sal division offers scenic drives through the Huntington and Eccles Canyons National Scenic Byways known as the Energy Loop. These byways wind over the Wasatch Plateau, and there are several high elevation lakes and streams that feature excellent fishing and camping, and the Arapeen Trail System is also a popular spot.

In addition to viewing the amazing fall colors, tourists can take in the cities and towns along historical U.S. Highway 89, visiting antique shops, gift stores, bed and breakfast inns, historic sites, local history and culture, and more.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

SANPETE COUNTY DOUBLES AS MOVIE SET FOR FEATURE FILM

DATE 08/28/2005 8:35 PMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

SANPETE COUNTY DOUBLES AS MOVIE SET FOR FEATURE FILM

Parts of Sanpete County, including its Hub City, Mt. Pleasant, doubled as a movie set this past month for the filming of the feature film “Last of the Mustangs.”

Several hundred local residents even got a chance to serve as movie extras during the filming of a parade scene that was shot on Mt. Pleasant’s Main Street.

“There was a huge turn out, people came from all over — decked out in Western clothes — to give their kids a chance to be in the movie or to be an extra themselves,” says Monte Bona, a member of the Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council.

Bona says that Sanpete County and Mt. Pleasant appealed to the film’s producers because of its heritage buildings and beautiful landscape. “The area suited their film perfectly. There is great scenery and a lot of horses, sheep and other animals, as well as heritage homes and farms.” The director’s spouse also grew up in Ephraim so she was familiar with the region.

The Los Angeles-based movie crew spent nearly three weeks in Sanpete County shooting the film, which is about girl who decides to photograph wild horses for a school project. After visiting a ranch and falling in love with the horses, the girl learns about illegal activities that might jeopardize the mustangs.

Much of the film was shot at a ranch only a few miles away from Mt. Pleasant. Other scenes were shot in Mt. Pleasant City Hall, in local businesses and campgrounds, and even in the city’s police station and jail.

The horses that appear in the movie are also local “movie stars.” They were supplied by Lamont Christensen of Fairview, who owns Christensen Livestock Co.

The film, which will be released in theatres, stars Miranda Cosgrove as the girl who goes to the ranch, and Fred Ward as her father. Robert Wagner also has a small role.

Bona says that the Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council hopes more movies will be filmed in the area in the future. “Sanpete County really is an ideal film location,” he says. “It’s situated near the Provo and with two hours of the Salt Lake International airport. In addition, there are a lot of wide-open spaces and not too many power lines around, which makes it perfect for people hoping to re-create a pre-1950s feel in a film.”

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For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

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