Little Denmark Relic Home

This beautiful house was once the home of William Seely, a prominent citizen, Bishop of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1859 to 1890, first Mayor of Mt. Pleasant, businessman, and leader in Sanpete County.  One of the first homes to be built outside of the Mt. Pleasant Fort, is now known as the Relic Home.

Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter
Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter

Built in 1869 this magnificent structure has a hint of Greek Revival architecture.  Here he resided with his wife Charlotte and their nine children.

Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter
Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter

History has placed President Brigham Young at the home, helping to place the floor in the entry way and sitting at the dining room table during a visit.

Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter
Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter

It also has been reported that the final treaty was signed Saturday, September 7, 1872 that ended the Black Hawk War between the Ute Indians and the Mormon settlers, at the entrance of the home.

Representing the United States Government was General Morrow from Camp Douglas, and representing the Ute Native Americans were Sanpitch’s Chief Black Hawk and Chief Indian Joe placing their respective mark on the treaty. Chief Black Hawk History has recorded that Chief Black Hawk had been wounded at the battle on Diamond Hill; he stood tall and dignified as he signed the treaty.

 

Around 1949 or 1950 the Mt. Pleasant Historical Association acquired the home for the expressed use of a museum.

Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter
Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter

Here the rooms are filled with large hanging portraits on the walls of early pioneers, historical sites, and homes.

There is also a wealth of treasures in family histories and genealogies of the early pioneers and their descendants.

Photo Courtesy Randee Ryan Zinter
Photo Courtesy Randee Ryan Zinter

There has also been a collection of early homesteads and their history.

Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter
Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter

That is not all that is held within its walls, there are many artifacts that were used and worn during these early days in history.

Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter
Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter

This is a must see museum on your next trip in Sanpete County, Mt. Pleasant.

Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter
Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter

Along the north side of the property is an authentic working blacksmith shop, owned by Pete Hafen.  One of the many outstanding features of the shop is the Prairie Diamond Rings.

Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter
Photo Courtesy of Randee Ryan Zinter

 

It has been told that while crossing the mountains and plains a young couple fell in love and wanted to marry. Of course there was no money to be had, neither a general store, merchant, or jeweler. Hearing of the young couples plight, a kind blacksmith fired up the forge, and  took a horse shoe nail to make a wedding ring. 3 prairie diamond rings It became known as the Prairie Diamond due to the diamond shaped trademark stamped on the head of the nail that  represented the Diamond Company.  If you are lucky enough on your visit, Pete, the blacksmith just might have a supply on hand or be in the process of making a supply of rings to give the ladies that visit his shop.

Prairie Diamond

As the settlers came west to settle their land,

Many of the youth walked hand in hand.

Some fell in love and wanted to marry,

But, money and jewelry they did not carry.

A kind young blacksmith knew just what to do.

He bent the nail from an old horseshoe.

The Prairie Diamond  was the name of the ring. 

So much happiness it surely did bring.

Many of  the family histories, photographs, and a wealth of information contained in the Relic Home was assembled by Co-Director Tudy Standlee.  She has assembled and identified the information on the families so that visitors will know in an instant what treasures the Relic Home has to offer.  She has also responsible for the compiled history on the historic homes and their ownership since the beginning of Mt. Pleasant, Utah.