Category Archives: Sanpete

Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area Assists 30 Projects in the Past Year

Mormon-Pioneer-Heritage-Press-Release-year-end-report-03-03-2016

For more information: Monte Bona Director, Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

801-699-5065 Email: montebona@hotmail.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 3, 2016

The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area is making significant strides. During the recently completed annual reporting period, the MPNHA granted $235,000 for 30 projects, including the restoration of the Casino Star Theatre in Gunnison ($25,000); the first phase of restoration of a Civilian Conservation Corp. and World War II POW camp in Salina ($25,000); rehabilitation work on Miss Mary’s Historic School in Salina ($10,000); and restoration of Pierce Hall at Wasatch Academy ($15,000).

During the year, the MPNHA worked with partners from both the public and private sectors including the Utah Division of State History, the Casino Star Theatre Foundation, the Miss Mary’s Museum Committee, Salina City and Wasatch Academy supporters.

Along with these projects, the MPNHA published “Legends, Lore and True Tales in Mormon Country,” a collection of stories about the lives and experiences of people who settled Sanpete County. The volume has been placed in libraries and book stores both in the heritage area and along the Wasatch Front.

Work continued on MPNHA’s “Discovery Road” TV series with release of new episodes titled, “Wales and Outlaw Ways” and “Snow College Story.”

In 2016, the MPNHA will help fund restoration of the historic Mt. Pleasant City Hall and Armory ($5,000) along with providing continued funds ($10,000) for the restoration of the historic administration building on the Wasatch Academy campus.

It will also provide funding for architectural work for the third phase of the Escalante Hole-in-the-Rock Heritage Center ($5,000), for phase four of the Mt. Pleasant Equestrian Center ($5,000) and to help develop a biking trail at the Jacob Hamblin Park in Kanab ($5,000).

Additionally, work is already in progress on an episode of “Discovery Road” to celebrate the National Park Service’s 100th anniversary. The MPNHA annual 2015 report can be found at

http://www.mormonpioneerheritage.org/report-mormon-pioneer-nationalheritage/

### The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area includes 400 miles of glorious scenic byways, a vast array of wildlife, the best of western living, cattle and sheep ranches, and colorful mountain vistas, all within a trip on Utah Heritage Highway 89.

The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area Has 4 Best Main Streets

These 13 Towns in Utah Have the Best Main Streets You’ve Gotta Visit

There’s just something about the Main Street in any town. It’s often part of the town’s historic district, and typically features some of the oldest buildings in the area. The best Main Streets are bustling, vibrant places where members of the community, along with visitors, shop, eat and mingle. Here are a few of Utah’s best Main Streets; maybe you’ve visited some of them recently!

Which Main Streets did I miss? Share your favorite in the comments.

There’s Something Incredible About These 8 Rivers in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

For a desert state, Utah has a surprisingly large number of rivers! This is by no means a comprehensive list; I’ve tried to include a sampling of rivers from all parts of the state.

Did I miss your favorite Utah river?

PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND THE MORMONS SHARE A RICH HISTORY

Bryon C. Andreason author of Looking For Lincoln in Illinois series has a new addition to his collection with his newly published book, Looking For Lincoln In Illinois; Lincoln And Mormon Country .  This new book introduces the rich history of the early Mormon leaders and Abraham Lincoln.  This edition contains over thirty amazing stories that connect President Lincoln with the Mormon community and members.

Lincoln and Mormon Country by Bryon C. Andreasen
Lincoln and Mormon Country by Bryon C. Andreasen

It is an honor for the Mormons and the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area to be recognized by the Looking for Lincoln Heritage Coalition and the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area with the publication of Andreason’s latest addition to his popular series.

Andreason amply tells of the great generation of the nineteenth century pioneers and of the Latter-day Saints,  in Nauvoo to the state capital of Springfield.  Included in this publication are maps, historic photos, Mormon expeditions, descriptive battles, interesting events of his travels, the now famous inns in which Lincoln visited.   Also included in the edition are Brigham Young and various Mormon apostles of the time.
The book also includes colorful and engaging looks at key figures such as Brigham Young, various Mormon apostles, and more. Anyone inspired by Lincoln, as well as Mormon and Illinois history enthusiasts, will appreciate this look back at a long-past, but not forgotten, landscape.

 

Those with any interest in the history of the nineteenth century history, Abraham Lincoln, and Mormon history will sure be pleased with his latest publication.

Legends, Lore, & True Tales in Mormon Country Edited by Monte Bona
Legends, Lore, & True Tales in Mormon Country Edited by Monte Bona

There is another interest that the Looking For Lincoln and the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area have in common, it is the recently published book Legends, Lore& True Tales In Mormon Country.  This insightful book was edited by Monte Bona, Director of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area.

It contains contributions from authors Christian Probasco, Steven J. Clark, Eileen Hallet Stone, James Nelson, Jack C. Billings, Ed Meyer, Jack Monnet, Jason Friedman, and Shirley Bahlmann. These gifted authors have brought to life the exciting life and times in the Mormon Country.

Interesting and beloved stories of Brigham Young, Hiram Bebee, Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid, Maude Adams, Chief Walkara, Chief Black Hawk , and Zane Grey’s ghost and numerous other stories. This book is a wonderful addition to your library, our family truly enjoys learning between myth or fact in our new home.

These books are a great Christmas gift for all that have an interest in the Mormon Country, and in President Abraham Lincoln.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area “Discovery Road” to air on UEN

MPNHA-Press-Release-Discovery-Road-Hi-Ways-and-Byways

Linda Petersen

Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

801-554-7513

Email: linda@bpmedia.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Oct. 2, 2015

Utah Education Network TV (UEN) will begin airing “Discovery Road,” a series that grew out of a desire to tell the stories of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area and its people, on Saturday, Oct. 10 at 6 p.m. UEN broadcasts on Channel 9 in most parts of Utah.

Conceived in 2012, “Discovery Road” is an ongoing series of half hour shows featuring a ‘55 Pontiac affectionately named “Love Me Tender,” which hosts James Nelson and Maryda Nicole Gallo drive along U.S. Highway 89, All-American Road State Route 12 and Scenic Byway State Route 24.

Using music, storytellers and the characters in the communities along the way, the hosts present the history, scenery and culture of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area in an entertaining and educational manner. “

The whole idea behind the show is to get people to do what they used to do on Sunday afternoons — take a drive,” said MPNHA Executive Director Monte Bona.

UEN-TV Program Manager Kyle Anderson said “Discovery Road” is a great fit for the station. “At UEN our main purpose is to reach to the statewide community,” he said. “Discovery Road is a good local resource with a lot of good stories about Utah and Utah history. It’s very well done and entertaining.”

James Nelson and M. Nicole Gallo driving “Love Me Tender”, a ‘55 Pontiac, outside Spring City on Heritage Day.

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The show’s times lot at 6 p.m. on Saturdays is great for people who are coming in from the outdoors and want to be both educated and entertained, Anderson said.

October schedule: Oct 10, 6 p.m. “Don’t Let Them Be Forgotten”

This episode tracks the Blackham family, who were barely subsisting working in the cotton mills of England’s industrial revolution in the latter 1800s, to joining the LDS church and migrating to Sanpete County. They paved the way for current-day descendents, who are farmers, att orneys, business leaders, musicians, teachers, and politi cians, including present-day mayors of two Sanpete cities.

Oct 17, 6 p.m. “Music Is the Reason”

Welsh pioneers to Zion were sent to Sanpete County to develop a “Coal Bed” (the original name of Wales Town in Sanpete County), bringing with them their native gift of music. The coal ran out, but these musical miners produced both the world-famous Mormon Tabernacle Choir and the Osmond Family, to name just two.

Oct 24, 6 p.m. “The Heritage Experience”

A busload of travel writers heads north from Zion’s National Park along Heritage Highway 89, visiting historic stops along the way, including Mom’s Café in Salina and Clarion, the short-lived Jewish settlement west of Centerfield.

Oct 31, 6 p.m. “Mormon Trail: Black Experience”

Returned Mormon missionary Marcus Ewell discovers his family history includes an ancestor who served in the Mormon Batt alion and another who traveled the Mormon trail. The Discovery Road crew visits Marti ns Cove, Winter Quarters and many other places on their journey to the past. As the visit to yesterday plays out along the trail, a mystery unfolds about who might have been with the Ewell family every step of the way.

**Upcoming shows:

Nov. 7 Mormon Trail – The Forgotten Ones

Nov. 14 Mormon Trail – The Disabled Ones

Nov. 21 Nati ve Americans and Sacred Water

Nov. 28 Filmmakers Shootout in Kane County

Dec. 5 Garfi eld County*

Dec. 12 Scandinavian Show*

Dec. 19 The Dreams I Left Behind* Merrill Osmond joins “Discovery Road” as a guest in “Music is the Reason.”

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After airing on Saturdays, each show will air again at noon the following Wednesday.

“Wherever we go while producing Discovery Road episodes people ask where they might be able to see the shows. When we tell them UEN, they nod approval and tell us that’s a place for good programming. We agree. The programming is diverse, educati onal and entertaining. We are delighted to be a part of it,” said Discovery Road Co-host Maryda Nicole Gallo.

In addition to airing on UEN, “Discovery Road” is running on several stations in central and southern Utah, including CentraCom Interactive’s Channel 10, Manti Telecommunications’ Channel 3 and KTTA in Monroe.

Interested viewers may find out how to access UEN-TV at http://www.uen.org/tv/translators/

*December programming is tentative as Discovery Road has several more episodes in production which may take the place of currently scheduled shows.

** Descriptions of these episodes may be found on the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area, www.mormonpioneerheritage.org/discovery-road-videos.

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About the MPNHA:

The Mormon Pioneer Heritage Area is a federally designated area of central and southern Utah running along the beautiful and historic U.S. Highway 89 — including the All-American Road Utah State Route 12, and Capitol Reef Scenic Byway Utah State Route 24, which both intersect with U.S. 89 and together form the MPNHA’s Boulder Loop. The area includes the counties of Sanpete, Sevier, Piute, Wayne, Garfield and Kane.

About UEN: The Utah Education Network was established more than 20 years ago by the Utah State Legislature to coordinate telecommunications technology for public and higher education. UEN infrastructure serves public education, higher education, applied technology, libraries, government, and other public entities by providing networking, application and support services, serving a vital role in anticipating and meeting the educational needs of our state.

A Great Honor Paid to Monte Bona, Director of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

Monte Bona receives the Pioneers in Progress Award
Monte Bona receives the Pioneers in Progress Award

July 30, 2015 12:15 am  • 

MT. PLEASANT—Monte Bona, who has been a member of the Mt. Pleasant City Council for over 20 years, has had many opportunities to pat himself on the back over the years for his many accomplishments.

But Bona is not that way, he prefers to work “under the radar” so to speak and “keep a low profile”.

Most recently Bona received a great honor during the Days of ’47 Pioneers of Progress Awards ceremony in the historic and creative arts category for his vision of preserving historic buildings and taking the “seed” of an idea that later turned Highway 89 into becoming a national area designation. Bona currently serves as Director of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area (MPNHA).

As far back as 1994 the National Trust for Historic Preservation told Bona there was a story to tell about the colonization and architecture along Highway 89 which turned into the Sanpete Heritage Council and later the MPNHA which spans 400 miles within central and southern Utah.

Senator Bob Bennett sponsored the bill and with the help of Representatives Chris Cannon and Jim Matheson, the bill was passed in July 2006 and signed into law by President George W. Bush in October of that year. Others who played key roles in the designation were Wilson Martin, former director of the Utah Division of State History and Brad Shafer, a member of Bennett’s staff. The management plan was approved by the Secretary of the Interior in March 2010.

“The award was given in honor of the Mormon pioneers. There are 49 designation national heritage areas in the U.S. We are the only one named after a people. The Pioneers of Progress Awards go to individuals, not organizations. I agreed to accept the award on behalf of all of our partners in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area,” said Bona.

Since the designation, Bona has worked with great partners including the Utah Division of State History assisting in the restoration of many historical buildings along the corridor. In Mt. Pleasant alone, because of the fundraising efforts of Wasatch Academy, there have been two buildings restored, the First Presbyterian Church, which is also used as a music conservatory for Wasatch Academy, and Liberal Hall, which was the first home of Wasatch Academy and now a museum.

Along the strip, two Carnegie libraries in Mt. Pleasant and Ephraim; Casino Star Theater, Gunnison; Peterson Dance Hall, Fairview; a historic plaza at Snow College, Ephraim; and a monument of the Quilt Walk, Panguitch; are just a few restoration and developments that have taken place.

Bona has also promoted the area with television productions, the Black Hawk War, and programs, such as Discovery Road, seen on KJZZ and UEN, and most recently a new book edited by him entitled, Legends, Lore & True Tales in Mormon Country. Local writers include Jason Friedman, Steve Clark, Jack Monnett and Shirley Bahlmann. The book is available at Amazon and locally at Skyline Pharmacy, Mt. Pleasant.

Although Bona chose to not seek re-election to the Mt. Pleasant City Council this year, he plans to remain an active participant with the many projects in continuing with the MPNHA.  He is also heavily involved with the Mt. Pleasant Main Street Committee, which serves as the executive committee of the Community Development and Renewal Agency (CDRA)

In the beginning the assessed evaluation in the CDRA was $6M and is currently set at about $23M. By 2018 when the designation expires, Bona hopes the value will be in the neighborhood of $30M.

Bona has also received awards from the Utah Heritage Foundation, Utah Division of State History Outstanding Contribution and the Regional Recognition Award from Utah’s Six County Association of Governments.

The Most Beautiful, Charming Small Towns In Utah for 2015

Here Are The Most Beautiful, Charming Small Towns In Utah

Utah has grown by leaps and bounds in the last few decades; once small towns have grown to medium-sized ones (at least by Utah standards). Of course, you can still find many beautiful little towns across the state. This list isn’t meant to be a “Best Of.” It’s simply a list of a few small towns we think are great (in no particular order!). We chose towns with populations between 612 and 5,130, though many residents living in towns with populations of 10,000 or even 20,000 might enjoy that small-town atmosphere.

 

The Mormon Miracle Pageant in Manti, Utah

Miracle pagaent

June 18-20, 23-27, 2015

Every June comes an experience of dance, drama, music, and a cast totaling over 800 performing on a stage that is larger than a football field.  This compelling story of ancient American history comes alive in dramatic scenes that tells of the classic battle of good over evil.  The many characters in this pageant will remain with you long after the last performance, perhaps will stay with you always.  Here you will be introduced to the likes of Ammon, Captain Moroni, King Lamoni. Mormon, Samuel the Lamanite and many more.

Mormon Miracle Pageant
Mormon Miracle Pageant

The pageant is right off the Utah Heritage Highway 89,  where the scene settings unfold under the starlit night with the exquisite Manti Temple sitting stately before the audience.  From the east there is the beauty of the landscape maybe as it was in ancient times when the inhabitants of the pageant lived and died.  Here you will visit the reenactment of the resurrected Christ visit these ancient people that will be depicted in the Mormon Miracle Pageant.

 

Christ visits the laminites

Here you will see the resurrected Christ appear after the great destruction that followed His crucifixion.  He will heal the sick, and bless the children.  You will learn how the sacred records were preserved in this, our time.

These ancient records are provided to Joseph Smith and the people that God has come together to help Joseph translate and publish the Book of Mormon.  Through the story of fictional characters Robert and Mary Henshaw, you will experience their struggle as they search for religious truth. In the awe inspiring finale, you will come to know the overpowering knowledge that love and families are eternal.

Manti-Pageant-580

The saga of the Mormon Miracle Pageant unfolds at the base of the magnificent Sanpete, Manti LaSal Mountains, with the fresh, cool canyon breeze, and the canopy of the evening stars preparing a perfect night for the performance to begin.  Major enhancements have been made for a more enjoyable experience such as new sets, newly staged scenes, and new costumes.

manti-pageant-733x436-7manti

This year the most awaited scene of the resurrected Christ’s appearance to the ancient people on the American continent will be included this year in the pageant.  The Mormon Miracle Pageant will share with you and your family another testament of Christ.

While food is allowed on the Manti Temple grounds, please clean up and carry out any garbage that you have brought in with you.  There are several fast food facilities close by the pageant location

For pageant information, call 1-866-961-9040 . The Sanpete County Travel Council, 345 West 100 North, Ephraim, UT 84627, 435-283-4321 or 800-281-4346 has further information about the local area. Many families camp at local parks and campgrounds. We urge all pageant visitors to strictly observe speed limits and traffic laws. Please, treat the private property of local residents with respect.

Memorial Day Honoring Family and Traditions

mt. Pleasant Cemetery graves

Memorial Day has always been a family tradition.  No matter where we moved,  we always went to the family cemetery to honor our family.  Decorating the graves was a responsibility my father would say “someday you will take on this responsibility and teach it to your children.”

Well, here we are as grandparents taking our wonderful grandchildren to the graves of family members to honor them.  What I saw this year was a wonderful example of the past and the present.  Grandchildren reverently placing flowers on the graves of family members that are six and seven generations past.

This year there was more joy as we spent the day together talking to the children, telling them stories.  We focused on the living and the funny family stories of the past.  We still missed those who have preceded us, but it was a sweet remembering this year.  What does bring tears to my eyes is the respect, reverence, and the United States flags flying high to honor our fallen military men and women.

Cadets, alumni and volunteers from St. Thomas Academy worked with Fort Snelling National Cemetery staff to put up hundreds of American flags ahead of the Memorial Day weekend,  on Wednesday,  May 21,  2014 . (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)
Cadets, alumni and volunteers from St. Thomas Academy worked with Fort Snelling National Cemetery staff to put up hundreds of American flags ahead of the Memorial Day weekend, on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 . (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

There is truly something amazing beyond description that seeing lanes lined with the United States flying.  I am proud to be an American, I am proud that my father was a WWII Veteran.  I am proud that my husband was a Viet Nam Veteran.  I am proud of all those who have offered their lives for the freedom our country represents.  I am proud of those who continue to fight for our freedom, and pray that someday they will all come home.  I pray that we will be able to continue to represent a land of opportunity, one where we all live in peace and in times of peril, there will continue to be brave men and women who feel as deeply as those of past days and take their ranks in the military.

I pledge Allegiance to the flag of the United States of America; and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

Mt Pleasant flags

I am so grateful that the cemeteries in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area, no matter how small that they might be, flew the United States of American Flag proudly for those who gave their lives for all that this great nation!

 

13TH ANNUAL RAT FINK 2015 REUNION

Ed "Big Daddy" Roth
Ed “Big Daddy” Roth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13th Annual ED “BIG DADDY” ROTH’S RAT FINK REUNION

June 4th thru 6th, 2015 at 404 East 300 North, Manti, UT

ratfinkreunionCAR SHOW SATURDAY JUNE 6th! 8A.M Manti City Park 200 N 400 W, Manti

Parade of show cars car show in Manti

Manti’s Main Street 5 pm Car, Truck & Bike Show

In the world or hot rodding, Big Daddy Roth was a legend.  He was one of the founders of Kustom Kulture.  He was the renowned creator of one-of-a -kind hot rods.  As creator of a little green rat, Rat Fink, he epitomizes hot rodding.  His little green monster designs still appeal to both the young and the old.

Ed Roth’s artwork appeared in underground comics in the 1980’s and the middle of the 1990’s.  Many classify his work as fine art, and can be seen in art galleries.

Mr Roth passed away in 2001.  His passion continues on with the dedication his wife Ilene Roth has to carry on his legacy.

The Reunion hosts many events fun for the entire family.  Come to Manti, Utah on Utah Heritage Highway 89 for a fun family event.

 

 

 

Legends, Lore and True Tales in Mormon Country (American Legends) By Monte Bona

 

legends lore and true tales in mormon country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monte Bona, along with the collaborative efforts of talented professionals have given us an authentic view of those brave men, women and children who left their homes, family, wealth, and country to establish the communities in South Central Utah.

The powerful stories of the early settlers in the region that is now identified by the Congressional designation as the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area, are touching, informative, and compelling

These pioneers certainly left a legacy that illustrates a structure that was steeped in  codes of conduct, traditions, and  principles that everyone embraced for the sole purpose of succeeding in a somewhat hostile environment.  Their stories come to life as you read of their inventiveness, cooperation,  conscientiousness, and pure resilience.     You will also be moved stories of with miracles that occurred..

Many may be interested to learn that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, or Mormons were not the only secular group that assisted with the settling  of Utah.   Jewish settlements, and contributions of a Presbyterian Minister, were instrumental.   There were great sacrifices, large doses of humility, and traditional morals that were all combined to make their efforts a true success.

I have a great appreciation for the time intensive work completed by Monte Bona that has gone into producing Legends, Lore and True Tales in Mormon Country (American Legends).  It is commendable that such an undertaking has been made to tell their stories. What a great job he has done!

The pictures are an added bonus, they help to recreate the trials, tribulations and the triumphs of  the early pioneers.  Mr. Bona has done a tremendous job in compiling this must have book for those who seek to find their family history, and a great resource for future generations.  Without a doubt this is a book that you will read, reread, share, and  retell the stories, legends, lore and true tales to everyone.  I highly recommend this book to all who seek the true tales in Mormon Country.

 

Cowboys, Outlaws, and the Movies

Who doesn’t like a good old western?  They are always filled with plenty of action, the good guys always win and the wrong has been righted!

Utah has had over 900 films, television series, and TV made movies filmed here. Within the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area is the best known landscape that was featured in the films by Director, John Ford and the famous “Duke” John Wayne.

John Wayne and John Ford's favorite place to film westerns.
John Wayne and John Ford’s favorite place to film westerns.
John Wayne "Fort Apache"
John Wayne “Fort Apache”
Rod Taylor "Billy The Kid"
Rod Taylor “Billy The Kid”
tom Mix "The Deadwood Coach"
tom Mix “The Deadwood Coach”
John Wayne starring in "Stagecoach" 1939
John Wayne starring in “Stagecoach” 1939

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Butch Cassidy, or Robert Leroy Parker was raised in Circleville, Utah.  His family cabin was once open to the public, but due to considerable damage to the cabin by past visitors taking a memento from the cabin, it was damaged.  The cabin is now closed to the public.

Matt Warner, or Willard Erastus Christiansen was  born in Ephraim, UT in the Little Denmark Area.  He was  an outlaw and Butch rode with Matt’s gang the Wild Bunch.  Butch and Matt rode to Telluride, Colorado as an introduction to bank robbery.

The unique landscape features a geological wonderland that has been the backdrop for feature films including; “Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid,” and “Jeremiah Johnson.” While traveling through the picturesque scenery, you might recognize a scene or two. Included in the heritage area is the birthplace of Utah outlaws, Butch Cassidy and Matt Warner. Matt was a lifelong friend and a gang member alongside of Butch.  Many movies were filmed in the scenic Under the Rim District of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area.

jeremiah-johnson-1

 

Native American presence in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area – Press Release 12/31/14

December 30, 2014

For immediate release

WHAT: Native American presence in the MPNHA.

WHEN: Deadline not specified

WHERE: Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

CONTACT: Monte Bona, MPNHA Exec. Director – (801) 699-5065

EMAIL: montebona@hotmail.com

WEBSITE: http://www.mormonpioneerheritage.org, www.uen.org.

FACEBOOK: Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

Native American Heritage and Presence

By: Steven J. Clark

Richfield, UT: A trip down the Mormon Pioneer Heritage Highway (U.S. Hwy 89) not only puts travelers in touch with rural settings that harken back to the earliest days of our pioneer roots, but also allows travelers a brush with history that extends much farther back.

Monte Bona, Executive Director of the MPNHA, says that the Highway 89 corridor is home to a rich Native American history, dating back thousands of years. “We want to view the Native American influence in the MPNHA not just in its historical context,” Bona said, “but also in the context of how their culture and traditions contribute to our society today.”

Fairview Museum, Fairview Utah, Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

Just one block east of Highway 89, at Fairview, UT, is the Fairview Museum that houses, among other things, the huge skeleton of a prehistoric Mammoth, found during the excavation of Huntington Reservoir. The skeleton is the centerpiece of the museum, but in the surrounding halls is one of the state’s best collections of pictures and artifacts detailing the presence of a significant population of Native Americans, primarily Paiutes, in Sanpete Valley.

Native American Fremont Tribe Pit House Entry Utah Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

Further south, the Sevier Valley has both an ancient and a modern Native American history. The ancient part is preserved at the Fremont Indian State Park, located on Interstate 70, a few miles west of the Highway 89 turnoff to Panguitch. The museum houses artifacts and presents displays of the ancient Fremont’s living conditions, while the park’s hiking trails lead to preserved petroglyphs and the ruins of ancient building structures. Fremonts are thought to have inhabited the area at approximately the same time the Anasazi cultures flourished further south and east in Arizona and New Mexico.

Sevier Valley’s contemporary Indian history is reflected by the presence of the Koosharem Band of Paiute Indians, who occupy two communities in the county. The first is a collection of homes found right in the heart of Richfield City. Were it not for the sign on the east side of North Main Street that declares the presence of a small, subdivision-size reservation, few would even know of its presence.

Travelers on Interstate 70 at Joseph, UT see a collection of seven or eight homes on the west side of the freeway and assume it’s just a far-flung subdivision someone from Joseph decided to develop. But it’s actually reservation land, and the homes are occupied by Koosharem Band Paiute families.

Mystic Hot Springs Monroe, Utah Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

There are special places near the town of Monroe, in Sevier County, where hot mineral water bubbles out of the ground. They are marked from a distance by the yellow and gold colored soil and rocks that show the mineral traces left by the hot springs over millennia. One spring is commercially developed and calls itself Mystic Hot Springs. The other is only slightly developed, with soaking tubs and a fire pit.

Historians say that prehistoric Indians considered the unique water features to be sacred, as evidenced by the rock art, artifacts and ruins found in the area. In more modern times, Mormon pioneers used the water for soaking pools, with many users claiming that the water had special healing properties.

According to Bona, the MPNHA, is consulting with Native Americans in the area regarding the organization’s intent to develop an interpretive center at one of the hot springs. “Native Americans used these hot springs long before Mormon pioneers arrived,” he said. “We want to be sure we treat them with the dignity and respect they deserve, not just from our viewpoint, but also from theirs.”

At the extreme southern end of the MPNHA, Highway 89 Alt, brushes past the Kaibab Paiute Band Reservation at Kanab, Utah’s sister city, Freedonia, AZ, while the regular Highway 89 route through Page, AZ, crosses into to the vast Navajo reservation and skirts the Hopi reservation that is completely surrounded by the Navajo homeland.

Bona says that he hopes the MPNHA signs placed along Highway 89 will put travelers in mind of the fact that there is not just a Mormon pioneer history in the area, but also an important native peoples’ history as well.

(Uncropped, unenhanced images are available upon request in electronic format (.jpeg)). MPNHA is if federally recognized, non-profit organization dedicated to education and historic preservation within the MPNHA)

Museums Located in Little Denmark

Fairview
Fairview Museum of History and Art

 

The Fairview Museum has something for everyone from personal handwritten heirloom family stories, records of founding forefathers genealogy, Native American artifacts, art work from local artists, sculptures by Arvard T. Fairbanks, and a true life scale of a massive mammoth.  This Columbian mammoth was almost fully intact when it was discovered as the Wasatch Plateau was being excavated at the Huntington Reservoir in 1988.

Fairview Art and Natural Museum

Stop in for all that the Fairview Museum has to offer  Don’t forget to visit the outdoor equipment that has been collected, that was once used by early settlers of the area.

Mount Pleasant

Bishop Seely and Relic Home Museum

Relic Home 1

Fountain Green
Fountain Green Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum and Old Tithing House

Manti
Manti Historic City Hall
Pattern House and Old Manti School/Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum

Spring City
Spring City Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum and Old Jail

Local Artisans and Galleries in Little Denmark

There are numerous artisans and galleries in Little Denmark, each one unique. You can find artisans specializing in: country, western, landscapes, exhibits, quilting, weaving, woodworking, murals, paintings, pottery, carvings, silversmiths, gunsmiths, violin makers, saddlery, custom boots, and numerous other crafts that will delight all.

Ephraim

  • Accent Wear in Ephraim
    • Address: 15 East 300 South, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: 435) 283-4133
  • Carver Predator Calls
    • Address: 380 East 400 South, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-6525
    • Mobile/Other: (435) 340-0303
  • KJB Silversmithing
    • Address: 161 West Center, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-4016
  • Pressed For Time
    • Address: 238 South 100 East, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-4788
  • Steve Olsen Knives in Ephraim
    • Address: 420 East 400 South, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-6344
  • Traditional Building Skills Institute
    • Address: 150 E College Ave., Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-7000
  • John Young Knives
    • Address: 483 East 400 South, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-4555

Centerfield

Fairview

  • Ancestors in Oil in Fairview
    • Address: 185 E 400 N, RR 1 Box 81, Fairview, UT 84629
    • Phone: (435) 427-9172
  • The Art Studio
    • Address: 239 S. 200 E., Fairview, UT 84629
    • Phone: (435) 262-0324
  • Conforme Belle
    • Address: 186 West 200 North, Fairview, UT 84629
    • Phone: (435) 469-1226
  • North Bend Trading Post
    • Address: 40 S State, P.O. Box 183, Fairview, UT 84629
    • Phone: (435) 427-9390

Fountain Green

  • R.A. Smith Custom Fly Rods
    • Address: 315 S 500 W, P.O. Box 367, Ft. Green, UT 84632
    • Phone: (435) 445-3497
  • Slickrock Leather Works
    • Address: 874 West 400 North, Ft. Green, UT 84632
    • Phone: (435) 851-6637
  • Stewart Artworks
    • Address: 590 West 200 North, Ft. Green, UT 84632
    • Phone: (435) 445-3531

Manti

Moroni

  • Aldridge Fine Art Studio in Moroni
    • Address: 110 South 300 West, Moroni, UT 84646
    • Phone: (435) 436-8815

Mt. Pleasant

  • Paul Hart Violins
    • Address: 36 W. Main Street, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    • Phone: (435) 462-0301
  • The Illusion Academy in Mt. Pleasant
    • Address: 180 North State, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    • Phone: 435) 462-4545
  • Peel Furniture Works
    • Address: 565 West Main Street, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    • Phone: (435) 462-2887
  • Pioneer Art in Mt. Pleasant
    • Address: 720 Walkara Ave, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    •  Phone: (559) 859-3861
  • Mighty Quinn Studios / Jason Quinn
    • Address: 118 E. Main Street, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    • Phone: (435) 462-4531

Spring City

  • Osral Allred Fine Art
    • Address: P.O. Box 152, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-2137
  • Antler’s Gift Shop
    • Address: 465 North Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-5642
  • The Art of Joan Durfey
    • Address: 94 West 100 North, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 262-0360
  • Black Canyon Taxidermy
    • Address: P.O. Box 361, 300 N 300 E, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-2661
  • C. M. Carving in Spring City
    • Address: 409 E 200 N, PO Box 190, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-9535
  • Douglas Fryer Fine Art 
    • Address: P.O. Box 394, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-2640
  • FiddleSticks Celtic Music
    • Address: 95 East 400 South, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 221-1108
    • Mobile/Other: (801) 369-1243
  • Foxglove Cottage
    • Address: P.O. Box 220, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-9618
  • Fine Art of Susan Gallacher
    • Address: 12 North Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 486-5019
  • Horseshoe Mountain Pottery
    • Address: 278 S Main, PO Box 186, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-2708
  • Jock Jones Handcrafted Windsor Chairs
    • Address: 125 South Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 915-201
  • LGK Studios
    • Address: P.O. Box 104, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-9603
  • Shirley McKay Fine Art
    • Address: 190 North Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 226-7097
    • Mobile/Other: (435) 462-0378
  • The Nest Gallery in Spring City Outlaw Glass Blowing
    • Address: P.O. Box 251, 150 N 600 E, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 262-0345
  • M’lisa Paulsen Fine Art
    • Address: 119 W 200 N, P.O. Box 36, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-3454
    • Mobile/Other: (801) 910-4191
  • Kathleen Peterson Fine Art
    • Address: 12755 North 8500 East, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-4319
  • Randall Lake Original Oil Paintings
    • Address: 63 West 300 South, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 521-4609
  • Sanpete Spur & Silver
    • Address: 735 S Main, P.O. Box 403, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-7490
  • Scientific Glass Arts and Research
    • Address: 150 North 600 East, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (510) 381-3436
  • Kerry Soper Fine Art
    • Address: 190 North Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 224-4129
  • Walker Custom Boots
    • Address: 1335 N Hwy 117, P.O. Box 561, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-3669
  • Amanda Willey Studios
    • Address: P.O. Box 274, Spring City, UT 84662
  • Michael Workman Studio
    • Address: P.O. Box 441, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-3937

Annual ATV Tours Set For Aug. 10-11

DATE 07/31/2007 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Annual ATV Tours Set For Aug. 10-11

The annual Manti Scenic Mountain ATV Tours will be held Aug. 10 to 11 in Sanpete County and showcase the pristine vistas of Manti Canyon.

Manti and all of Sanpete County are known for beautiful, well-designed and well-managed ATV trails and trail systems. The now-yearly ATV tours attract all-terrain vehicle enthusiasts, dealers and others to the region for two-days of riding, exhibits and performances. Each day during the event, local guides help riders make their way through 40-miles of intermediate ATV trails and forest areas that run from 5,600 feet to more than 10,000 feet.

The Aug. 10 “Sheep Trail and Vicinity Run” begins with a continental breakfast and registration at the Manti LDS Stake Center, 300 South Main Street, from 7 to 8:30 a.m., with a departure time of 9 a.m. At noon lunch will be held at the 12-Mile Campground. The ride concludes at 4:30 p.m., and a Dutch Oven dinner will be held at 6 p.m. at the Historical City Hall picnic area. ATV equipment will be on display and musical entertainment will begin at 7 p.m.

The Family Day Trail Ride, intended for beginner and intermediate riders, will be held Aug. 11 and includes a “Poker Run” and Digital Camera Scavenger Hunt. It also begins with a continental breakfast and registration from 7 to 8:30 a.m. at the LDS Stake Center, with a 9 a.m. departure time. There will be a 10:30 a.m. rest stop at the Fox Jet Reservoir and lunch at the Duck Fork Reservoir. The ride concludes at 4:30 p.m., with prizes awarded for the Poker Run and scavenger hunt.

The cost of each ride is $25 per person, with a family rate of $20 per person for families of four or more. A portion of the fees are used to help maintain ATV trail riding.

The Manti Scenic Mountain ATV Tours were started to encourage tourism and to promote the trails in the region’s mountain regions, which are considered some of Utah’s most scenic areas. The event is sponsored by Manti City and the Sanpete County Office of Economic Development, with event hosts including the Manti Area Chamber of Commerce and the Manti City Economic Development Committee.

Applications and information about the tours are available by calling 435-835-5050 or 435-835-3923. Information is also available online at www.sanpete.com

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Seventh Annual Soap Box Derby Returns to Mt. Pleasant

DATE 06/25/2007 7:15 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Seventh Annual Soap Box Derby Returns to Mt. Pleasant

What do soap box derby’s and Mountain Man rendezvous have in common? Both are phenomenon’s that took the United States by storm – albeit 100 years apart. Rendezvous were popular between about 1824 and 1850, and soap box derby’s were all the rage about a century later.But more recently, their commonality is that both events are part of the July 4 celebrations in Sanpete County, and this year is no exception.

Mt. Pleasant city is gearing up to hold its seventh annual soap box derby and Mountain Man Rendezvous the Fourth of July weekend.

The derby races will be held July 4 from 1 to 3 p.m. Mt. Pleasant’s Main Street will take on the look of yesteryear for the event, which was designed to bring the once-popular races back to the streets of Mt. Pleasant.

Soap Box Derby races used to be a popular event in Sanpete County, with a lot of local residents taking part as children. The races first became popular in the 1930s.

It is believed they officially started when a Dayton, Ohio, Daily News Photographer encountered three boys racing homemade, engine-less cars down an inclined brick street. He reportedly came up with the idea to hold a coasting race and award a prize to the winner. The first official race was held in 1933, with more than 300 kids showing up with homemade cars built of orange crates, sheet tin, wagon and baby-buggy wheels and almost everything of “junk value.”

As to be expected, Soap Box derby races have grown in popularity and sophistication over the years, with contests now full of regulations and restrictions. But Sanpete County’s races remain true to the original “anything goes” soap box derby philosophy, says event organizer John McClellan. Cars can be made of any material, including plastic, wood, metal. They should be about six to seven feet long and about three feet wide. Drivers should range in age from about eight to 16 years.

For additional information on the races, contact McClellan at (435) 462-3808.

The annual Blackhawk Mountain Man Rendezvous will be held starting June 30 from 9 .m. to dark in Mt. Pleasant’s city park. The popular four-day festival attracts hundreds of shooters, traders and enthusiasts from throughout Utah and other parts of the United States. A main attraction is “Traders Row” that includes historic items like those made and sold at Mountain Men Rendezvous before 1840.

On July 4, there will be a Dutch-oven cook off, exhibits, trading, displays, candy cannon explosions, tomahawk and knife-throwing contests, frying pan tosses, kids games, Native American dancers, historical re-enactments and more.

The rendezvous was started and is planned yearly by David and Pat Gonzalez, who are longtime enthusiasts of Mountain Men rendezvous, with help from the Sanpete County Heritage Council. Pat Gonzalez herself produces numerous items that she sells at rendezvous, including bead work, boxes covered in animal hide, and leather and wool dresses.

For more information, contact the Dave Gonzalez, (435) 462-0152 or Mt. Pleasant City, (435) 462-2456.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Candy Bomber Will Highlight Mt Pleasant Fly-In

DATE 06/21/2007 7:15 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Candy Bomber Will Highlight Mt Pleasant Fly-In.

Gail Halverson, renowned as the Berlin Candy Bomber, will be the guest speaker at the Mt. Pleasant Fly-In. He will speak at the Mt. Pleasant Airport at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, June 22nd.

Col. Halverson was an Air Force Lieutenant in 1948-49 when he was touched by the friendliness and excitement of the children of Berlin. He decided to do something special for them and dubbed his effort “Operation Little Vittles”. He gathered all of the candy he could find and attached it to miniature parachutes. His pilot buddies joined the effort with candy, gum and handkerchiefs, and the candy bombing

began. The American Confectioners Association came aboard and sent tons of candy and gum to Westover AFB for processing. Lt. Halverson received additional troop support when 22 schools in Chicopee, MA converted an old fire station into a Little Vittles Headquarters. They made parachutes and tied on candy and gum. The final product was shipped to Halverson at Rhine Main AFB.

By January, 1949, more than 250,000 parachutes loaded with candy had been dropped on Berlin by Lt. Halverson and his fellow pilots to reach over 100,000 children who were in Berlin during the Russian Blockade. Col. Halverson received the Cheney Award in 1948″ for an act of valor, extreme fortitude, or self-sacrifice in a humanitarian interest.”

Col. Halverson’s appearance at the Fly-In is part of a two day event that will feature morning and evening RC Aerobatic Shows on Friday, June 22nd. A fund raising breakfast for a Haitian orphanage will be held on Saturday morning, June 23rd, at 7:30 a.m.

From 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., on Saturday, children (8-17) will be given free airplane rides (as recourses allow).

Helicopter rides ($25 per person) will be open to the public from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, along with activities for children, including the candy parachute drop at noon.

The Fly-In is part of an on-going effort by David Fullmer, the volunteer manager of Mt. Pleasant’s airport. Fullmer is a recreational pilot who has big plans for Mt. Pleasant’s little airport. The Fly-In is part of a ten year effort by Fullmer to cater to those who fly for pleasure. His goal is to entice pilots to visit Sanpete County for an afternoon, a day or even longer.

“Mt. Pleasant’s Airport is unique among rural airports because it’s so close to town, ” says Fullmer. Most rural airports are miles away from the nearest town, making it difficult for pilots to access services such as restaurants or motels. “But our airport is only about a half a mile from the edge of town. It gives us a lot of options.” He adds that there are countless other attractions in the area that add to the appeal factor: fishing, miles of high mountain trails for 4-wheeling, mountain biking and hiking, rock climbing at Maple Canyon and snowmobiling and snow kiting in the winter.

“Once the airport becomes known in the pilot community in Utah and the Intermountain West as a place that caters to recreational pilots and as a center point for a great place to visit, all kinds of things can happen”.

For more information about the Fly-In or the Mt. Pleasant Airport, contact Fullmer at 435-427-9131

Information about the Fly-In is available online at www.sanpeteflyin.org. Fullmer may be reached via email at tpjr@cut.net.


# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Sanpete County Hosts Second Annual ‘Bike for the Cure’ Ride Through Spring City

DATE 06/11/2007 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Sanpete County Hosts Second Annual ‘Bike for the Cure’ Ride
Through Spring City

Sanpete County will host the second “Bike for the Cure,” a family-oriented event aimed at raising awareness and fund for breast cancer research on Saturday, June 16.

The now annual event was started by Ephraim resident Erika Stover and her best friend, Melanie Wathen last year as a way to honor Stover’s mother, Susan Sermersheim, who died of breast cancer after a five-year battle.

“My mother loved Spring City,” Stover says. “She and my stepfather used to come down from Springville just about every Sunday and just drive around looking at the old houses. She loved the history of the area.”

Stover, who has three young daughters of her own, said a bike race was the perfect way to honor her mother, who was an advocate for finding a cure for breast cancer, and to raise awareness of the need for research.

“We encourage cyclists of all ages and skill levels to come out and take part, as well as anyone who has been touched by breast cancer,” Stover says.

All proceeds from the non-profit event will go to Breast Cancer 3-Day, benefiting the Susan G. Komen Foundation, which is dedicated to help finding a cure for breast cancer.

Cyclists can choose from among three rides: 5.5 miles; 42 miles; and 58 miles. The shorter ride includes a tour of Spring City’s historical homes. “It’s perfect for families,” Stover says. That ride begins at 9 a.m., and people should meet at 150 E. Center Street in Spring City. Cost is $30.

The longer rides will begin at 7:30 a.m. from the same location. Cost for the longer rides is $40. Registration fees for all three rides include lunch and a T-shirt.

Registration is available online at on www.active.com . (search for “Bike for the Cure” under upcoming events). Registration forms are also available by contacting Erika Stover at 435-283-2158.

Additional registration forms can be found at local bike shops throughout Utah. Registration is also available the day of the event.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Hundreds of Iraq-Bound Soldiers Invited to Lead ‘Big Daddy Roth’ Parade

DATE 05/25/2007 7:15 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Hundreds of Iraq-Bound Soldiers Invited to Lead ‘Big Daddy Roth’ Parade

Hundreds of Iraq-Bound Soldiers Invited to Lead ‘Big Daddy Roth’ Parade, Collect Custom-Designed ‘Rat Fink’ T-Shirts

Some 450 soldiers who will soon be deployed to Iraq will have some special new “uniforms”to take along with them – a “Rat Fink” T-shirt especially designed for them based on an original drawing by the late Ed Roth.

The members of the Utah Army National Guard’s 1/145th field artillery unit will be presented with the shirts by Roth’s widow, Illene Roth, June 2 during the fifth annual “Big Daddy Roth” open house, which runs May 31 to June 2 in Manti.

Roth also invited the entire infantry to lead the annual ‘Big Daddy’ parade. It starts at 5 p.m. on Saturday and runs down Manti’s Main Street. She doesn’t know how many soldiers will attend, but said all 450 of them are welcome.

Ed Roth was famous for designing and building hotrod cars and for creating the cartoon character “Rat Fink” in the 1960s, a rodent who was featured on posters, T-shirts and other items for years.

In 1966, he created a decal for army soldiers being deployed to Vietnam and the image was modified with Ilene Roth’s permission for soldiers in Iraq. This is the first batch of shirts to be handed out to troops going to Iraq.

“Since our local unit, which includes my son, is being deployed in June, I thought it would be great to send Ed’s image on a t-shirt to help them with this war,” says Ilene Roth.

The local guard unit provided input for the custom changes made to the image, and a shirt will be provided to each soldier. In addition, T-shirts will be available on-line and at the reunion for anyone else wanting to show their support, Roth says. “(The reunion) is a great opportunity to give the T-shirts to our guys. I wish them GOOD LUCK!”

Illene Roth started the annual “Big Daddy Roth” open house after her husband’s death in 2001 to honor his memory and work. It is held each year at the museum that was created to showcase her late husband’s art and memorabilia. The museum, which is an addition on the Roth home, is located at 404 East 300 North, Manti.

An avid hotrod enthusiast from the age of 12, Ed Roth started out by fixing up old cars in his garage. He then moved on to building cars from scratch and quickly became known as an artist rather than a mechanic, with his creations earning the title “sculptures on wheels.” He financed his passion by making cartoons and T-shirts, including drawings of cars and monsters driving cars, including Rat Fink.

The museum that Ilene Roth created to honor her late husband, which includes displays of Ed Roth’s art work and other memorabilia, will also be open during the reunion and is open to the public year-round by appointment.

Other highlights of the weekend include a “postcard run” Friday night to places that are connected to Ed Roth, and the parade and a car show on Saturday in Manti’s park.

Ed Roth’s life was the subject of a new documentary, Tales of the Rat Fink, by Canadian film maker Ron Mann. The movie stars John Goodman as Big Daddy Roth. It’s a combination biography/cultural commentary on Roth. Goodman narrates the film from heaven, playing Roth as he looks down on Earth with fond memories. The film also includes the voices of Jay Leno, the Smothers Brothers, Matt Groening and Paul Lemat. The real Ed Roth is included in the film in archival footage and new interviews.

The film was screened in Utah last year and in 2006 and 2007 was seen during festivals around the world, most recently in Michigan in March and in April in Singapore.

Ilene Roth said her late husband met with Mann in 2000 when he came to Utah to discuss the movie. She said her husband was very excited about having a movie produced to spotlight his creations with Rat Fink and fiberglass cars.

Ilene Roth met her husband after he moved to Manti from California in 1987.

For more information about the Ed “Big Daddy” Roth Open House, call (435) 835-2393.

Information is also available online at: http://www.edroth.com/

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Spring City Readies For Heritage Day

DATE 05/19/2007 7:15 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Spring City Readies For Heritage Day

Spring City Readies For Heritage Day, Event Will Coincide with Scandinavian FestivalPeople coming to Sanpete County for this weekend’s Scandinavian Festival will also have the opportunity to take in a bit of Utah history while they are in town.

The entire town of Spring City, located about 12 miles from Ephraim, is listed on the National Historic register. And once a year, the residents of this small artists community open their doors to everyone.

This year’s Heritage Day will be May 26. The day-long event includes historical tours of more than a dozen restored homes and buildings, including beautiful pioneer homes, the recently restored Old Spring City School, and the bishops storehouse; an art show featuring local artisans; and an antique show that will include a saddle display, furniture and farm equipment.

The home tour, sponsored by the Friends of Historic Spring City and the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers (DUP), is an annual event in Spring City during the Memorial weekend. Tickets go on sale the day of the event and are $10 for adults and $5 for children and can be purchased at the Old Firehouse on Main Street or at the Old Spring City School, site of the art and antiques show.

The tour will include architecture as well as commercial buildings, public buildings and Spring City’s famous LDS chapel. This year’s tour includes three new restorations on the town’s Main Street: the Orson and Mary Ann Hyde House, the Jensen House (an Arts-and-Crafts-inspired bungalow), and one of the town’s earliest stone houses, the Paul and Charles Kofford house. Three other houses on the tour are “works-in-progress,” including the Judge Jacob Johnson house, the largest historic house in Spring City.

A popular attraction each year is the Spring City Public School, which was restored via a community effort and is now used for public events. Built in 1899, the school has eight classrooms, four on each level, as well as a large attic space, complete with windows. At one time, it housed all the grades, and was even used as a middle school and high school.

A complete list of homes on the tour is available online at:http://scandinavianheritagefestival.com/spring.aspx

# # #

For more information Contact:Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Sanpete County to ‘Velcomme’ Thousands for Scandinavian Festival

DATE 05/18/2007 7:15 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Sanpete County to ‘Velcomme’ Thousands for Scandinavian Festival

Velcomme! That is what Ephraim City and all of Sanpete County will be saying the weekend of May 24 to 26 when thousands of people gather in the region for the annual Scandinavian Heritage Festival and Conference.Among the largest Scandinavian heritage events in the Western United States, the arts and cultural festival includes an educational conference, an authentic Little Scandinavian Supper, costumed performers telling Hans Christian Andersen fairy tales, craft booths, historical tours, workshops, sporting events, and more. Entertainment scheduled for this year’s event ranges from folk dancing to classic rock.

Many local residents dress in Scandinavian costume for the duration of the festivities, which have been known to attract upwards of 10,000 to Sanpete County.

New to the festival this year is a series of ceramics workshops hosted by the Central Utah Arts Center Thursday-Saturday. The workshops will feature alternative firing methods for ceramics and will allow participants to take home a unique creation from the event.

Sanpete County’s culture has been greatly influenced by settlers who arrived first in the Salt Lake Valley from the Scandinavian countries, says Gary Anderson, Utah State University extension and vice chairman of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area.

Many were farmers, carpenters, stone masons, cabinetmakers and furniture builders. and then were assigned to colonize central Utah. “The architecture of their farm buildings, cabins and houses were influenced by construction techniques and building forms from back home, a uniqueness that is still present today,” he says.

It is believed that some 650,000 Utahans trace their ancestry to Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Iceland.

The festival begins Thursday night with the Scandinavian Heritage conference held at Snow College. The free educational event, which continues Friday morning, gives participants an opportunity to learn about and reflect on the lives of pioneer founders of the Sanpete Valley.

Following the conference, the weekend is jammed packed with activities and events at the festival grounds location at Pioneer Park, 50 N. 100 West, and on the north side of the Snow College campus.

Highlights Friday include workshops on ‘fast fire’ pottery, storytelling and a bread baking contest; the 12 p.m. opening of the “Old World Craft Booths,” educational exhibits of crafts that date back to Ephraim’s Scandinavian ancestors; musical performances starting at 3 p.m., a two-day quilt show, and the gourmet smorgasbord Scandinavian dinner Friday at 6 p.m.

On Saturday there will be a fun run starting at 7 a.m., a 10 a.m. parade down Main Street at noon, and more demonstrations of Old World crafts including blacksmithing, woodcarving, pottery making. There will be music and activities all day, a golf tournament, roast beef dinner and more.

In addition, there will be tours of Ephraim’s exquisitely restored pioneer homes and cabins starting from about noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at Pioneer Park. There will also be a historical bus tour of historical spots in Sanpete Valley that run hourly from 1 to 4 p.m. A complete schedule of events for the festival, including information on the conference, is available online at http://scandinavianheritagefestival.com

People may also call 435-835-4241 or 435-283-4631 for information.

# # #

For more information Contact:Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502
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