Category Archives: Fairview

MPNHA Photo Contest – $25 Prize

We know that you have some amazing photos, and now it’s time to share them! The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area is hosting a photo contest. It’s time to dust off the camera, phone, whichever you use to capture special moments and share some great pictures. You probably have some on your hard drive somewhere too!

To enter, users must upload their images to the MPNHA Facebook Page and submit a form (below) for each image that they enter into the contest.

Rules:

  • All photos must be be property of the entrant and an original work. If you are submitting for someone else, permission must be obtained before uploading the image.
  • All photos must be taken inside the boundaries of the MPNHA.
  • Photo enhancements are allowed.
  • The entry can be used on the MPNHA’s social media channels, website, etc. and will be credited to the entrant.
  • If people are included in the image, a release is required for entry.
  • All entrants must submit a short entry form in addition to uploading the image onto the MPNHA Facebook page.
  • The final date to enter is July 21, 2017 at midnight, mountain time.
  • The winner of the contest and $25 gift card to a retailer of their choice will be selected by the number of likes on their image. Ask your friends to vote for your image! In the event of a tie, the images with the same number of likes (loves, etc.) will be assigned a random number and then picked at random. The winner will be chosen and contacted on July 31, 2017.
  • There is no age limit to participants (under 13 years of age must have parental permission) or limit to the number of images that are allowed, as long as every image has been submitted into the form below.
  • Voting starts when you upload your image, so enter earlier for your best chance.
  • Those who work for the MPNHA are not eligible to enter/win.
  • Have fun.

MPNHA Receives Grant from National Park Foundation and Polaris to Expand Recreational Opportunities

 MPNHA Press Release - Polaris- National Park Foundation Grant

 

 

NPS Grant to MPNHA

5 Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area Towns are Recognized

Move to These 14 Towns in Utah if You Want to Get Away From it All

has listed 5 Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area Towns.  This is a great honor to be recognized, of course Director, Monte Bona sates that, “I think that each one of our communities should be recognized as outstanding towns to raise your child or retire. These are just wonderful areas with even better citizens.”

If you live in one of Utah’s larger cities, you might dream of moving somewhere far away from other people. Our state has lots of small, rural towns that offer a much quieter, peaceful existence. Of course, job opportunities, shopping and entertainment are much harder to come by in these little towns. But that’s the point, isn’t it?

A Great Honor Paid to Monte Bona, Director of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

Monte Bona receives the Pioneers in Progress Award
Monte Bona receives the Pioneers in Progress Award

July 30, 2015 12:15 am  • 

MT. PLEASANT—Monte Bona, who has been a member of the Mt. Pleasant City Council for over 20 years, has had many opportunities to pat himself on the back over the years for his many accomplishments.

But Bona is not that way, he prefers to work “under the radar” so to speak and “keep a low profile”.

Most recently Bona received a great honor during the Days of ’47 Pioneers of Progress Awards ceremony in the historic and creative arts category for his vision of preserving historic buildings and taking the “seed” of an idea that later turned Highway 89 into becoming a national area designation. Bona currently serves as Director of the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area (MPNHA).

As far back as 1994 the National Trust for Historic Preservation told Bona there was a story to tell about the colonization and architecture along Highway 89 which turned into the Sanpete Heritage Council and later the MPNHA which spans 400 miles within central and southern Utah.

Senator Bob Bennett sponsored the bill and with the help of Representatives Chris Cannon and Jim Matheson, the bill was passed in July 2006 and signed into law by President George W. Bush in October of that year. Others who played key roles in the designation were Wilson Martin, former director of the Utah Division of State History and Brad Shafer, a member of Bennett’s staff. The management plan was approved by the Secretary of the Interior in March 2010.

“The award was given in honor of the Mormon pioneers. There are 49 designation national heritage areas in the U.S. We are the only one named after a people. The Pioneers of Progress Awards go to individuals, not organizations. I agreed to accept the award on behalf of all of our partners in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area,” said Bona.

Since the designation, Bona has worked with great partners including the Utah Division of State History assisting in the restoration of many historical buildings along the corridor. In Mt. Pleasant alone, because of the fundraising efforts of Wasatch Academy, there have been two buildings restored, the First Presbyterian Church, which is also used as a music conservatory for Wasatch Academy, and Liberal Hall, which was the first home of Wasatch Academy and now a museum.

Along the strip, two Carnegie libraries in Mt. Pleasant and Ephraim; Casino Star Theater, Gunnison; Peterson Dance Hall, Fairview; a historic plaza at Snow College, Ephraim; and a monument of the Quilt Walk, Panguitch; are just a few restoration and developments that have taken place.

Bona has also promoted the area with television productions, the Black Hawk War, and programs, such as Discovery Road, seen on KJZZ and UEN, and most recently a new book edited by him entitled, Legends, Lore & True Tales in Mormon Country. Local writers include Jason Friedman, Steve Clark, Jack Monnett and Shirley Bahlmann. The book is available at Amazon and locally at Skyline Pharmacy, Mt. Pleasant.

Although Bona chose to not seek re-election to the Mt. Pleasant City Council this year, he plans to remain an active participant with the many projects in continuing with the MPNHA.  He is also heavily involved with the Mt. Pleasant Main Street Committee, which serves as the executive committee of the Community Development and Renewal Agency (CDRA)

In the beginning the assessed evaluation in the CDRA was $6M and is currently set at about $23M. By 2018 when the designation expires, Bona hopes the value will be in the neighborhood of $30M.

Bona has also received awards from the Utah Heritage Foundation, Utah Division of State History Outstanding Contribution and the Regional Recognition Award from Utah’s Six County Association of Governments.

Memorial Day Honoring Family and Traditions

mt. Pleasant Cemetery graves

Memorial Day has always been a family tradition.  No matter where we moved,  we always went to the family cemetery to honor our family.  Decorating the graves was a responsibility my father would say “someday you will take on this responsibility and teach it to your children.”

Well, here we are as grandparents taking our wonderful grandchildren to the graves of family members to honor them.  What I saw this year was a wonderful example of the past and the present.  Grandchildren reverently placing flowers on the graves of family members that are six and seven generations past.

This year there was more joy as we spent the day together talking to the children, telling them stories.  We focused on the living and the funny family stories of the past.  We still missed those who have preceded us, but it was a sweet remembering this year.  What does bring tears to my eyes is the respect, reverence, and the United States flags flying high to honor our fallen military men and women.

Cadets, alumni and volunteers from St. Thomas Academy worked with Fort Snelling National Cemetery staff to put up hundreds of American flags ahead of the Memorial Day weekend,  on Wednesday,  May 21,  2014 . (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)
Cadets, alumni and volunteers from St. Thomas Academy worked with Fort Snelling National Cemetery staff to put up hundreds of American flags ahead of the Memorial Day weekend, on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 . (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

There is truly something amazing beyond description that seeing lanes lined with the United States flying.  I am proud to be an American, I am proud that my father was a WWII Veteran.  I am proud that my husband was a Viet Nam Veteran.  I am proud of all those who have offered their lives for the freedom our country represents.  I am proud of those who continue to fight for our freedom, and pray that someday they will all come home.  I pray that we will be able to continue to represent a land of opportunity, one where we all live in peace and in times of peril, there will continue to be brave men and women who feel as deeply as those of past days and take their ranks in the military.

I pledge Allegiance to the flag of the United States of America; and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

Mt Pleasant flags

I am so grateful that the cemeteries in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area, no matter how small that they might be, flew the United States of American Flag proudly for those who gave their lives for all that this great nation!

 

Legends, Lore and True Tales in Mormon Country (American Legends) By Monte Bona

 

legends lore and true tales in mormon country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monte Bona, along with the collaborative efforts of talented professionals have given us an authentic view of those brave men, women and children who left their homes, family, wealth, and country to establish the communities in South Central Utah.

The powerful stories of the early settlers in the region that is now identified by the Congressional designation as the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area, are touching, informative, and compelling

These pioneers certainly left a legacy that illustrates a structure that was steeped in  codes of conduct, traditions, and  principles that everyone embraced for the sole purpose of succeeding in a somewhat hostile environment.  Their stories come to life as you read of their inventiveness, cooperation,  conscientiousness, and pure resilience.     You will also be moved stories of with miracles that occurred..

Many may be interested to learn that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, or Mormons were not the only secular group that assisted with the settling  of Utah.   Jewish settlements, and contributions of a Presbyterian Minister, were instrumental.   There were great sacrifices, large doses of humility, and traditional morals that were all combined to make their efforts a true success.

I have a great appreciation for the time intensive work completed by Monte Bona that has gone into producing Legends, Lore and True Tales in Mormon Country (American Legends).  It is commendable that such an undertaking has been made to tell their stories. What a great job he has done!

The pictures are an added bonus, they help to recreate the trials, tribulations and the triumphs of  the early pioneers.  Mr. Bona has done a tremendous job in compiling this must have book for those who seek to find their family history, and a great resource for future generations.  Without a doubt this is a book that you will read, reread, share, and  retell the stories, legends, lore and true tales to everyone.  I highly recommend this book to all who seek the true tales in Mormon Country.

 

Native American presence in the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area – Press Release 12/31/14

December 30, 2014

For immediate release

WHAT: Native American presence in the MPNHA.

WHEN: Deadline not specified

WHERE: Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

CONTACT: Monte Bona, MPNHA Exec. Director – (801) 699-5065

EMAIL: montebona@hotmail.com

WEBSITE: http://www.mormonpioneerheritage.org, www.uen.org.

FACEBOOK: Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

Native American Heritage and Presence

By: Steven J. Clark

Richfield, UT: A trip down the Mormon Pioneer Heritage Highway (U.S. Hwy 89) not only puts travelers in touch with rural settings that harken back to the earliest days of our pioneer roots, but also allows travelers a brush with history that extends much farther back.

Monte Bona, Executive Director of the MPNHA, says that the Highway 89 corridor is home to a rich Native American history, dating back thousands of years. “We want to view the Native American influence in the MPNHA not just in its historical context,” Bona said, “but also in the context of how their culture and traditions contribute to our society today.”

Fairview Museum, Fairview Utah, Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

Just one block east of Highway 89, at Fairview, UT, is the Fairview Museum that houses, among other things, the huge skeleton of a prehistoric Mammoth, found during the excavation of Huntington Reservoir. The skeleton is the centerpiece of the museum, but in the surrounding halls is one of the state’s best collections of pictures and artifacts detailing the presence of a significant population of Native Americans, primarily Paiutes, in Sanpete Valley.

Native American Fremont Tribe Pit House Entry Utah Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

Further south, the Sevier Valley has both an ancient and a modern Native American history. The ancient part is preserved at the Fremont Indian State Park, located on Interstate 70, a few miles west of the Highway 89 turnoff to Panguitch. The museum houses artifacts and presents displays of the ancient Fremont’s living conditions, while the park’s hiking trails lead to preserved petroglyphs and the ruins of ancient building structures. Fremonts are thought to have inhabited the area at approximately the same time the Anasazi cultures flourished further south and east in Arizona and New Mexico.

Sevier Valley’s contemporary Indian history is reflected by the presence of the Koosharem Band of Paiute Indians, who occupy two communities in the county. The first is a collection of homes found right in the heart of Richfield City. Were it not for the sign on the east side of North Main Street that declares the presence of a small, subdivision-size reservation, few would even know of its presence.

Travelers on Interstate 70 at Joseph, UT see a collection of seven or eight homes on the west side of the freeway and assume it’s just a far-flung subdivision someone from Joseph decided to develop. But it’s actually reservation land, and the homes are occupied by Koosharem Band Paiute families.

Mystic Hot Springs Monroe, Utah Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area

There are special places near the town of Monroe, in Sevier County, where hot mineral water bubbles out of the ground. They are marked from a distance by the yellow and gold colored soil and rocks that show the mineral traces left by the hot springs over millennia. One spring is commercially developed and calls itself Mystic Hot Springs. The other is only slightly developed, with soaking tubs and a fire pit.

Historians say that prehistoric Indians considered the unique water features to be sacred, as evidenced by the rock art, artifacts and ruins found in the area. In more modern times, Mormon pioneers used the water for soaking pools, with many users claiming that the water had special healing properties.

According to Bona, the MPNHA, is consulting with Native Americans in the area regarding the organization’s intent to develop an interpretive center at one of the hot springs. “Native Americans used these hot springs long before Mormon pioneers arrived,” he said. “We want to be sure we treat them with the dignity and respect they deserve, not just from our viewpoint, but also from theirs.”

At the extreme southern end of the MPNHA, Highway 89 Alt, brushes past the Kaibab Paiute Band Reservation at Kanab, Utah’s sister city, Freedonia, AZ, while the regular Highway 89 route through Page, AZ, crosses into to the vast Navajo reservation and skirts the Hopi reservation that is completely surrounded by the Navajo homeland.

Bona says that he hopes the MPNHA signs placed along Highway 89 will put travelers in mind of the fact that there is not just a Mormon pioneer history in the area, but also an important native peoples’ history as well.

(Uncropped, unenhanced images are available upon request in electronic format (.jpeg)). MPNHA is if federally recognized, non-profit organization dedicated to education and historic preservation within the MPNHA)

Museums Located in Little Denmark

Fairview
Fairview Museum of History and Art

 

The Fairview Museum has something for everyone from personal handwritten heirloom family stories, records of founding forefathers genealogy, Native American artifacts, art work from local artists, sculptures by Arvard T. Fairbanks, and a true life scale of a massive mammoth.  This Columbian mammoth was almost fully intact when it was discovered as the Wasatch Plateau was being excavated at the Huntington Reservoir in 1988.

Fairview Art and Natural Museum

Stop in for all that the Fairview Museum has to offer  Don’t forget to visit the outdoor equipment that has been collected, that was once used by early settlers of the area.

Mount Pleasant

Bishop Seely and Relic Home Museum

Relic Home 1

Fountain Green
Fountain Green Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum and Old Tithing House

Manti
Manti Historic City Hall
Pattern House and Old Manti School/Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum

Spring City
Spring City Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum and Old Jail

Local Artisans and Galleries in Little Denmark

There are numerous artisans and galleries in Little Denmark, each one unique. You can find artisans specializing in: country, western, landscapes, exhibits, quilting, weaving, woodworking, murals, paintings, pottery, carvings, silversmiths, gunsmiths, violin makers, saddlery, custom boots, and numerous other crafts that will delight all.

Ephraim

  • Accent Wear in Ephraim
    • Address: 15 East 300 South, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: 435) 283-4133
  • Carver Predator Calls
    • Address: 380 East 400 South, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-6525
    • Mobile/Other: (435) 340-0303
  • KJB Silversmithing
    • Address: 161 West Center, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-4016
  • Pressed For Time
    • Address: 238 South 100 East, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-4788
  • Steve Olsen Knives in Ephraim
    • Address: 420 East 400 South, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-6344
  • Traditional Building Skills Institute
    • Address: 150 E College Ave., Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-7000
  • John Young Knives
    • Address: 483 East 400 South, Ephraim, UT 84627
    • Phone: (435) 283-4555

Centerfield

Fairview

  • Ancestors in Oil in Fairview
    • Address: 185 E 400 N, RR 1 Box 81, Fairview, UT 84629
    • Phone: (435) 427-9172
  • The Art Studio
    • Address: 239 S. 200 E., Fairview, UT 84629
    • Phone: (435) 262-0324
  • Conforme Belle
    • Address: 186 West 200 North, Fairview, UT 84629
    • Phone: (435) 469-1226
  • North Bend Trading Post
    • Address: 40 S State, P.O. Box 183, Fairview, UT 84629
    • Phone: (435) 427-9390

Fountain Green

  • R.A. Smith Custom Fly Rods
    • Address: 315 S 500 W, P.O. Box 367, Ft. Green, UT 84632
    • Phone: (435) 445-3497
  • Slickrock Leather Works
    • Address: 874 West 400 North, Ft. Green, UT 84632
    • Phone: (435) 851-6637
  • Stewart Artworks
    • Address: 590 West 200 North, Ft. Green, UT 84632
    • Phone: (435) 445-3531

Manti

Moroni

  • Aldridge Fine Art Studio in Moroni
    • Address: 110 South 300 West, Moroni, UT 84646
    • Phone: (435) 436-8815

Mt. Pleasant

  • Paul Hart Violins
    • Address: 36 W. Main Street, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    • Phone: (435) 462-0301
  • The Illusion Academy in Mt. Pleasant
    • Address: 180 North State, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    • Phone: 435) 462-4545
  • Peel Furniture Works
    • Address: 565 West Main Street, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    • Phone: (435) 462-2887
  • Pioneer Art in Mt. Pleasant
    • Address: 720 Walkara Ave, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    •  Phone: (559) 859-3861
  • Mighty Quinn Studios / Jason Quinn
    • Address: 118 E. Main Street, Mt. Pleasant, UT 84647
    • Phone: (435) 462-4531

Spring City

  • Osral Allred Fine Art
    • Address: P.O. Box 152, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-2137
  • Antler’s Gift Shop
    • Address: 465 North Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-5642
  • The Art of Joan Durfey
    • Address: 94 West 100 North, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 262-0360
  • Black Canyon Taxidermy
    • Address: P.O. Box 361, 300 N 300 E, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-2661
  • C. M. Carving in Spring City
    • Address: 409 E 200 N, PO Box 190, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-9535
  • Douglas Fryer Fine Art 
    • Address: P.O. Box 394, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-2640
  • FiddleSticks Celtic Music
    • Address: 95 East 400 South, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 221-1108
    • Mobile/Other: (801) 369-1243
  • Foxglove Cottage
    • Address: P.O. Box 220, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-9618
  • Fine Art of Susan Gallacher
    • Address: 12 North Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 486-5019
  • Horseshoe Mountain Pottery
    • Address: 278 S Main, PO Box 186, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-2708
  • Jock Jones Handcrafted Windsor Chairs
    • Address: 125 South Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 915-201
  • LGK Studios
    • Address: P.O. Box 104, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-9603
  • Shirley McKay Fine Art
    • Address: 190 North Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 226-7097
    • Mobile/Other: (435) 462-0378
  • The Nest Gallery in Spring City Outlaw Glass Blowing
    • Address: P.O. Box 251, 150 N 600 E, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 262-0345
  • M’lisa Paulsen Fine Art
    • Address: 119 W 200 N, P.O. Box 36, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-3454
    • Mobile/Other: (801) 910-4191
  • Kathleen Peterson Fine Art
    • Address: 12755 North 8500 East, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-4319
  • Randall Lake Original Oil Paintings
    • Address: 63 West 300 South, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 521-4609
  • Sanpete Spur & Silver
    • Address: 735 S Main, P.O. Box 403, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-7490
  • Scientific Glass Arts and Research
    • Address: 150 North 600 East, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (510) 381-3436
  • Kerry Soper Fine Art
    • Address: 190 North Main, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (801) 224-4129
  • Walker Custom Boots
    • Address: 1335 N Hwy 117, P.O. Box 561, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-3669
  • Amanda Willey Studios
    • Address: P.O. Box 274, Spring City, UT 84662
  • Michael Workman Studio
    • Address: P.O. Box 441, Spring City, UT 84662
    • Phone: (435) 462-3937

Fairview, Ephraim Gearing up for Snowmobile ‘State Ride’

DATE 02/21/2006 7:15 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Fairview, Ephraim Gearing up for Snowmobile ‘State Ride’

Brian Howarth loves snowmobiling. He also enjoys helping to make a difference in people’s lives, especially children. On February 23 & 24, he will get the opportunity to combine his two loves by taking part in the Utah Snowmobile Association State Ride and Winter Festival being held in Ephraim and Fairview.“This is a great opportunity for the snowmobile community and our community to work together for a great cause,” says Howarth, president of the Skyline Sno-Riders, which is helping put on the event. The local club has twice been named “Snowmobile Club of the Year” by the Utah Snowmobiling Association and was awarded this honor for a third time again this year. In 2006 the Skyline Sno-Riders was the second-largest club in the state.

He added that people do not need to be a member of any snowmobiling club to attend the two-day event.

Highlights include an Ephraim Canyon Charity Fund Raising Ride and Poker Run Friday, Feb. 23, at 9 a.m. All proceeds raised will be given to the Utah Down Syndrome Foundation. Later that evening there will be a dinner and games at the Fairview Senior Citizen Hall.

On Saturday, Feb. 24, there will be snowmobile drag races starting at 8 a.m. near the Rodeo Grounds. The Fairview Canyon ride will begin at 9 a.m. at the canyon’s trail head. In addition, Fairview city will host vendors of outdoor equipment and an OHV Training class for 8 to 16 year olds Saturday afternoon. There will also be chilli “cook off” that afternoon and a Dutch Oven dinner and live entertainment open to the public at the Fairview Dance Hall that night.

In addition, the Skyline Sno-Riders Club will continue its “Operation Care Bear” tradition of collecting new stuffed bears to give to law enforcement agencies to pass on to children after an accident or other incident. Donations may be dropped off at local hospitals, city offices, sheriff’s office or county building. Last year 900 bears were given out to needy children.

The state ride and winter fest are expected to attract people from all over Utah and the inter mountain west. This is the third straight year that the Utah Snowmobiling Association has chosen to hold its “State Ride” in Fairview. “Simply put, it has some of the best riding in the entire country,” as stated in a recent four page article in “SnoWest” magazine, Howarth says.

Fairview also has a paved canyon road that leads to a trail head that provides access to more than 50 miles of trails to the north at Skyline Drive and some 30 miles to the south to Joe’s Valley. There is also a paved parking lot and warming shelters.

The great access, coupled with the great snow and diversity in the riding terrain made it a prime choice, Howarth says.

Howarth moved to Fairview from Utah County a few years ago and his entire family got involved in the Skyline Sno-Riders. The family also started several charity events tied to snowmobiling that have raised food and funds for the local food bank.

Howarth, his wife, Miko, his mother Darlene, and father, Clyde Mortensen, were also named the state’s top snowmobiling family of the year in 2004.

The Sno-Riders worked to establish a trailhead up Fairview Canyon; including putting in a paved parking lot, as well as a warming shelter located about 15 miles away from the trail entrance that is kept well-stocked throughout the season, which typically runs from December through April. During the off-season, the Sno-Riders also sponsors other events such as trail clean ups, an “adopt a highway” program and are also involved in working with the Forest Service to create another paved parking lot at the area know as “Big Drift” as well as enlarging the Skyline North parking lot next spring.

For information on the Feb. 23 & 24 rides, call Barbara Collard: 801-568-7000 (cell) or 801-254-6580. Reservations are required for the Saturday evening dinner at the Fairview Dance Hall as seating is limited. Cost is $19 per person. Call 435-427-3353 for reservations.

More information is also available online at www.skylinesno-riders.com and the Utah Snowmobile Association website at www.snowut.com or by phoning Brian at 435-427-3620 or by email, bhow@cut.net  or bhowarth@utah.gov.

http://www.skylinesno-riders.com  http://www.snowut.com

# # #

For more information Contact:Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

President Signs Mormon Pioneer Heritage Area Bill

DATE 10/19/2006 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

President Signs Mormon Pioneer Heritage Area Bill

A bill establishing the National Mormon Pioneer Heritage Area has been signed into law by President George W. Bush.

“I’m extremely pleased that after years of moving this bill through the legislative process President Bush has signed the National Mormon Pioneer Heritage Area into law,” said Sen. Bob Bennett, R-Utah, who sponsored legislation to create the heritage area. “This is a fitting tribute to Utah’s pioneers and one that will help promote economic development and preserve our unique heritage for future generations.”

The national designation recognizes the history, architecture and culture along “the heritage highway,” and includes U.S. Highway 89 from Fairview to Kanab, the Boulder Loop (state highways 12 and 24), the All-American Road (highway 12) and the six counties through which the route passes: Sanpete, Sevier, Piute, Wayne, Garfield and Kane.

Many local residents, including Monte Bona, executive director of the Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance, and Gary Anderson of Utah State University’s Extension, spent years working on the measure and Bona even helped draft the original bill. Bona called Bush’s signing “An important and historic event. It’s very rewarding to see the Mormon Pioneer Heritage Area officially established.” The initiative underwent several renditions in the past six years and survived three sessions of Congress.

Bona says that the cities and towns in the six-county area are the best remaining example of how Mormon pioneers colonized the west. “The heritage area includes countless examples of rich cultural and architectural history shaped by the early settlers,” he says.

The bill specified that up to $10 million may be spent on development of the heritage area, including activities such as historic preservation of buildings and signage, but no more than $1 million per year. Funds are matched on a 50 per cent basis.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Fairview, Ephraim Gearing up for Snowmobile ‘State Ride’

DATE 02/21/2006 7:15 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Fairview, Ephraim Gearing up for Snowmobile ‘State Ride’

Brian Howarth loves snowmobiling. He also enjoys helping to make a difference in people’s lives, especially children. On February 23 & 24, he will get the opportunity to combine his two loves by taking part in the Utah Snowmobile Association State Ride and Winter Festival being held in Ephraim and Fairview.“This is a great opportunity for the snowmobile community and our community to work together for a great cause,” says Howarth, president of the Skyline Sno-Riders, which is helping put on the event. The local club has twice been named “Snowmobile Club of the Year” by the Utah Snowmobiling Association and was awarded this honor for a third time again this year. In 2006 the Skyline Sno-Riders was the second-largest club in the state.He added that people do not need to be a member of any snowmobiling club to attend the two-day event.

Highlights include an Ephraim Canyon Charity Fund Raising Ride and Poker Run Friday, Feb. 23, at 9 a.m. All proceeds raised will be given to the Utah Down Syndrome Foundation. Later that evening there will be a dinner and games at the Fairview Senior Citizen Hall.

On Saturday, Feb. 24, there will be snowmobile drag races starting at 8 a.m. near the Rodeo Grounds. The Fairview Canyon ride will begin at 9 a.m. at the canyon’s trail head. In addition, Fairview city will host vendors of outdoor equipment and an OHV Training class for 8 to 16 year olds Saturday afternoon. There will also be chilli “cook off” that afternoon and a Dutch Oven dinner and live entertainment open to the public at the Fairview Dance Hall that night.

In addition, the Skyline Sno-Riders Club will continue its “Operation Care Bear” tradition of collecting new stuffed bears to give to law enforcement agencies to pass on to children after an accident or other incident. Donations may be dropped off at local hospitals, city offices, sheriff’s office or county building. Last year 900 bears were given out to needy children.

The state ride and winter fest are expected to attract people from all over Utah and the inter mountain west. This is the third straight year that the Utah Snowmobiling Association has chosen to hold its “State Ride” in Fairview. “Simply put, it has some of the best riding in the entire country,” as stated in a recent four page article in “SnoWest” magazine, Howarth says.

Fairview also has a paved canyon road that leads to a trail head that provides access to more than 50 miles of trails to the north at Skyline Drive and some 30 miles to the south to Joe’s Valley. There is also a paved parking lot and warming shelters.

The great access, coupled with the great snow and diversity in the riding terrain made it a prime choice, Howarth says.

Howarth moved to Fairview from Utah County a few years ago and his entire family got involved in the Skyline Sno-Riders. The family also started several charity events tied to snowmobiling that have raised food and funds for the local food bank.

Howarth, his wife, Miko, his mother Darlene, and father, Clyde Mortensen, were also named the state’s top snowmobiling family of the year in 2004.

The Sno-Riders worked to establish a trailhead up Fairview Canyon; including putting in a paved parking lot, as well as a warming shelter located about 15 miles away from the trail entrance that is kept well-stocked throughout the season, which typically runs from December through April. During the off-season, the Sno-Riders also sponsors other events such as trail clean ups, an “adopt a highway” program and are also involved in working with the Forest Service to create another paved parking lot at the area know as “Big Drift” as well as enlarging the Skyline North parking lot next spring.

For information on the Feb. 23 & 24 rides, call Barbara Collard: 801-568-7000 (cell) or 801-254-6580. Reservations are required for the Saturday evening dinner at the Fairview Dance Hall as seating is limited. Cost is $19 per person. Call 435-427-3353 for reservations.

More information is also available online at www.skylinesno-riders.com and the Utah Snowmobile Association website at www.snowut.com or by phoning Brian at 435-427-3620 or by email, bhow@cut.net  or bhowarth@utah.gov.

http://www.skylinesno-riders.com  http://www.snowut.com

# # #

For more information Contact:Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Sanpete ‘Cruise-In and Poker Run’ Set for Sept. 8-9

DATE 02/21/2006 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Sanpete ‘Cruise-In and Poker Run’ Set for Sept. 8-9

The sixth annual Sanpete Cruise-In and Poker Run will be held Sept. 8 to 9 in Mt. Pleasant City, aimed at attracting “old car” enthusiasts from around the state.

There will be prizes awarded in several categories, ranging from the car with the most bugs on it to the oldest car to the first car entered.

“All of the trophies are homemade, it’s just for fun,” says organizer Teri Morris. There will also be a special trophy presented by Ilene Roth, wife of the late “Big Daddy” Ed Roth, who was famous for designing and building hotrod cars and for creating the cartoon characters the Beatnik Bandit and Rat Fink.

“We just wanted to have an event that would allow people who wanted to show off their classic and antique cars to come and have them be seen by the entire county,” Morris says.

Morris started the car event six years ago in her hometown of Wales. But it’s grown too large to be accommodated in the small town, so this year it was moved to Mt. Pleasant, with the city park serving as the home base for the festivities. “We wanted a place that was more centrally located and where people could stay overnight nearby,” she says.

Highlights include dinner in the park on Friday accompanied by rock and roll music, followed by a cruise down Main Street at 8 p.m. On Saturday, there will be a day-long car show that is open to the public and an 11 a.m. “poker run,” preceded by breakfast in the park. For the poker run, participants drive their classic and antique cars to sponsoring businesses, including Cruisers in Fairview, Native Wines in Mt. Pleasant and Auto Zone in Ephraim, collecting playing cards at each stop. Upon return to the City Park, prizes are awarded for the best poker hand.

Last year, 60 cars and more than 150 people registered for the event, which includes the car show, dinner, breakfast and poker run. Registration cost is $25 in advance or $30 day-of.

“The entire event is open to the public, and a lot of things for people to see and do,” Morris says.

She originally came up with the idea of a “cruise-in” while contemplating ways to put some oomph into the region’s summer celebrations. She and her husband Glen, both “old car nuts” organized a car show. “The first show only had 10 cars, and six of them were ours,” she says. Since that time, the event has grown in popularity, attracting people from all over the state.

For more information, contact Teri Morris at 435-283-8286.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Sanpete County Gearing Up for Pioneer Day

DATE 02/21/2006 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Sanpete County Gearing Up for Pioneer Day

Parades, picnics, and fun runs are just some of the highlights of the Pioneer Day celebrations that will take place in Sanpete County. Several of the cities and towns in the region have planned numerous activities and events in the days leading up to and including July 24.

In Fairview, the celebrations begin July 20 with an ATV rodeo at 7 p.m. On Friday, July 21, there will be entertainment at 6 p.m. at the rodeo grounds followed by an “old-fashioned” kids’ rodeo at 7 p.m. The annual rodeo will be Saturday, July 22, at 8 p.m. Other highlights on Saturday include a co-ed softball tournament, a horse parade at 6 p.m., and entertainment at 7 p.m.

On Monday, July 24, festivities get underway at 6 a.m. with a “fireman’s wake-up call.” At 6:30 a.m., the “fun run” starts at the City Hall, followed by a 7 a.m. flag-raising ceremony, a fireman’s breakfast from 7 to 9 a.m., and a craft fair and vendor booths in the dance hall starting at 9 a.m. A children’s parade will be held at 10:30 a.m., followed by the Pioneer Day Parade at 11 a.m. At noon, lunch will be served in the city park. There will also be sand volleyball games, the Gateway to Skyline Drive Recreation Show, and a “Fairview Idol” talent contest. At 6 p.m., entertainment starts at the rodeo arena, followed by a derby and fireworks at dusk. For more information, call Peggy Johnson at 435-469-1069.

In Spring City, Pioneer Day celebrations begin Friday, July 21, with a all-ages street dance at 8 p.m. on Main Street. Events on Saturday, July 22, include a fireman’s breakfast from 7 to 9:30 am., a 10 a.m. parade followed by a car show at 11 a.m., and a children’s carnival and bake sale starting at noon in the city park. Live entertainment starts at 2:30 p.m. On Sunday, an Old-Time Gospel Music Program will be held at 7 p.m. at the City Bowery. For more information, call 435-462-2244.

Mayfield will hold its annual Pioneer Days on Monday, July 24. Highlights include a 10 a.m. “Mammoth Parade,” followed by food, entertainment, carnival booths, children’s races and other events in the town park. For more information, phone 435-528-5061.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

County a Hit With Tourism Experts, ‘FAM’ Tour Big Success

DATE 02/21/2006 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

County a Hit With Tourism Experts, ‘FAM’ Tour Big Success

County a Hit With Tourism Experts ‘FAM’ Tour Big Success

How do some Utah tourism experts who visited Sanpete County recently describe the region? Let’s count the ways:

“The perfect year-round playground.”

“A very enjoyable mixture of incredible scenic beauty, exciting outdoor activities, interesting pioneer heritage experiences.”

“So many things going for it as a tourism destination, it’s hard to keep track.”

“What a beautiful area! It’s unbelievable to me that Sanpete County isn’t more popular with local (Utah) tourists.”

These are just a sampling of some of the comments made by participants of the June 16 “FAM” tour sponsored by the Utah Office of Tourism. The event was intended to “familiarize” media and tour operators with some of Sanpete County’s “hot spots,” including the restored Moroni Opera House, Maple Canyon, the La-Sal National Forest, Ephraim, Manti and the Manti LDS temple, Mt. Pleasant and Fairview. Along the way, participants also heard about the county’s other cities, towns and attractions.

The purpose of “FAM” tours is to show travel agents, tour operators and media from various markets what the region has to offer in hopes of generating positive publicity about Utah’s world-class destinations, according to Tracie Cayford from the tourism office. If the comments received following the tour are any indication, the Sanpete County event was a smashing success.

“The climbing in Maple canyon is superb, and is a good alternative to sites a little closer to Salt Lake City,” said participant Austin Booth, who also remarked on the area’s beauty and commented that he couldn’t believe more tourist’s don’t flock to the region.

“From a historical perspective, the area is also great. I learned a lot about early Mormon settlement of Utah that I’d certainly never thought about before,” Booth said, adding he’d “highly recommended” it as a destination.”

Fellow tour participant Clayton Scrivner said he was impressed by how accessible the region is. “We were in Moroni 1 hour and 25 minutes after leaving the Salt Lake Valley.” He added the county has numerous “gifts” for visitors, including heritage and recreational sites. “Maple Canyon, the Wasatch Plateau, and all the great towns and their individual destinations… And don’t get me started on that temple, so majestic. I am sold on Sanpete.”

Chad Davis, another tour participant, also remarked on the region’s accessibility and uniqueness. “From Sanpete you can glance over the horizon and see the Wasatch Range in the distance, but it’s a world away from the Wasatch Front. Quaint pioneer villages, small town charm and outdoor recreation make it the perfect year-round playground.”

Next year, the state tourism office will be adding even more FAMS, promoting Utah’s national and state parks, ski resorts, cultural and heritage tourism areas, including other heritage attractions along U.S. Highway 89.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Fourth of July Weekend Will Be Sparklin’ in Sanpete County

DATE 02/21/2006 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Fourth of July Weekend Will Be Sparklin’ in Sanpete County

Sanpete County will be cracking and sparkling during the Fourth of July weekend, with events and festivals scheduled in numerous cities and towns.

Mt. Pleasant City will hold its annual “Hub City Days” celebrations starting on Friday, June 30. The event honors Mt. Pleasant as being the “Hub City” of Sanpete County and will include a rodeo, parades; games; fireworks and other events.

The festivities get underway on Friday, June 30, with the annual Blackhawk Mountain Man Rendezvous Dutch oven cook off dinner at 7 p.m. in the city park. The rendezvous continues on Saturday starting at 9 a.m. with a rifle shoot-out from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., a shotgun shoot at 2 p.m. and a knife and hawk throw at 4 p.m.

Many of the rendezvous participants will camp out in authentic tee pees and wall tents during the four-day event, which is expected to attract shooters and traders from throughout Utah and parts of the United States. Other events on Saturday include an all-aged rodeo at 7 p.m. that will include barrel racing, musical tires and ground and trailer racing. The rendezvous continues on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, with events including muzzle loading contest, dancing, musical performances, kids games, displays, traders and more. Monday at 7 p.m. there will be a Mutton Bustin’ rodeo at 7 p.m. Pre-sign-ups are required, for information call Debbie at 462-3816 or Pam at 462-2526.

On Tuesday, July 4, the day gets underway with a 7 a.m. fun walk/run. Donations will be accepted by the Lung Cancer Horseshoe Foundation for the American Cancer Society, with the funds earmarked for residents of Sanpete County. The walk/run will be followed by the annual IHC Hospital Foundation Breakfast in the city park starting at 7 a.m. The Children’s Parade begins at 11 a.m. and the Mammoth parade starts at 11:30, followed by a lunch in the city park sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Entertainment will begin at 1 p.m. and run throughout the day and evening. There will also be craft booths, games, displays and more. Another Mutton Bustin’ Rodeo will be at 7 p.m., followed by a spectacular fireworks display at 10 p.m.

Moroni’s Independence Day celebrations also begin June 30 with a talent show at the restored opera house at 6:30 p.m. On July 1, there will be a co-ed softball game, along with “mudd boggs” at the city arena at 2 p.m. On July 3, the city hosts its famous “BBQ Turkey Dinner” in the city part by the fire station from 6 to 8 p.m. Winners of the talent show will perform.

The July 4 festivities will begin with a 7 a.m. flag raising ceremony, a 7:15 a.m. fun run, and “Airplane ping pong” at 9:45 a.m., which includes the dropping of hundreds of prizes along a parade route. The city parade starts at 10 a.m., followed by a carnival, crafts, booths, a car show and other activities in the park from 10:30 a.m. to2:30 p.m., including a water slide and obstacle course. At 7:30 p.m., there will be a pre-fireworks variety show, with fireworks at 10 p.m. For information on Moroni’s festivities, contact Ron Pipher at 435-436-8359.

Gunnison will celebrate “Hometown Patriot Days” starting on July 2, with a patriotic fireside at 7 p.m. at the Gunnison LDS Stake Center. On July 3, there will be a roast beef dinner at city park at 6 p.m., followed by a patriotic program, auction, youth dance and fire works. On July 4, there will be a American Legion breakfast at the city park at 7 a.m. and an 8 a.m. flag ceremony, followed by a fun run and parade. There will be activities all day long at the city park, including games, food, volleyball, horseshoes, a book sale, art show, quilt show, car show, free swimming, a diaper derby, children’s races, a dunking machine and more. At 9 p.m., there will be a free family movie. For information, call Elise Bown at 435-528-3842.

Manti will mark the Fourth of July with a morning flag ceremony, breakfast in the park, concession and craft booths, day-long activities and tournaments, and fireworks at dusk. For specific details, contact Manti City Hall at 435-835-2401.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Heritage Highway to Benefit From ‘Preserve America’ Grant

DATE 02/21/2006 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Heritage Highway to Benefit From ‘Preserve America’ Grant

A project that will involve posting historical signs and markers along U.S. Highway 89, The Heritage Highway, has been selected to receive a Preserve America Grant worth nearly $100,000.

The grant was announced this week by First Lady Laura Bush, who is the honorary chair of Preserve America, a White House initiative that encourages and supports community efforts to preserve cultural and natural heritage.

The Sanpete County project was one of two Utah initiatives to receive support in this inaugural funding round. In total, grants totalling nearly $3.5 million were awarded to projects in 28 states.

The grant will be used to develop regional interpretative and marketing sites along Heritage Highway 89, extending from Fairview in the north to Kanab in the south, says Monte Bona, a member of the Utah Highway 89 Alliance and Mt. Pleasant City Council. The objective is to improve visitor appreciation for the heritage corridor by providing a theme and message through brochures, kiosks, and signage in the six counties along the highway, Bona says.

“Mt. Pleasant City and Sanpete County served as the designated applicant for the Highway because of its Preserve America status, but the beneficiaries also include Sevier, Piute, Wayne, Garfield and Kane counties. This a project for the all of the Mormon Pioneer Heritage Area,” he says.

The grant is Sanpete County’s latest connection to Preserve America. Two cities in the county — Mt. Pleasant and Manti — have been deemed “Preserve America” communities by the federal agency. In addition, Kanab, on the southern end of Highway 89, has also earned the honor.

The distinction recognizes and designates communities that protect and celebrate their heritage, use their historic assets for economic development and community revitalization, and encourage people to experience and appreciate local historic resources through education and heritage tourism programs.

Mt. Pleasant received its designation in August 2004 and Manti in November 2004. Mt. Pleasant was recognized for its preservation efforts and enjoyment of its historical and cultural resources as an important part of the country’s heritage. Manti was honored for its use of Old City Hall as a museum and travel and information center, and praised for the more than 4,200 community volunteer hours that went into revitalizing the building. The Manti Historic Preservation Commission, which was established in 2003, was also recognized by Preserve America for playing a vital role, as is the effort to have parts of the city listed in the National Register of Places as a historic district. Kanab was designated in 2005.

Communities designated through the program receive national recognition for their efforts. Benefits include use of the Preserve America logo, listing in a government Web-based directory to showcase preservation and heritage tourism efforts, and eligibility for special existing and proposed Preserve America grants and funding through various government agencies.

The overarching goals of Preserve America include a greater shared knowledge about the Nation’s past; strengthened regional identities and local pride; increased local participation in preserving the country’s cultural and natural heritage assets; and support for the economic vitality of communities.

For more information, visit www.PreserveAmerica.gov


# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Snowmobiling State Ride Coming Up, Sanpete’s Great Outdoors Making Headlines, Hitting the ‘Waves’

DATE 01/17/2005 7:15 AMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Snowmobiling State Ride Coming Up, Sanpete’s Great Outdoors Making Headlines, Hitting the ‘Waves’

The Utah Snowmobile Association’s annual “State Ride” is coming up Feb. 24 & 25, and Fairview Canyon is the chosen site for this year’s festivities.

The ride couldn’t come at a better time. Sanpete County’s many outdoor recreation opportunities are making the headlines of national newspapers these days and being broadcast over the airwaves.

The snowmobiling event is expected to attract people from all over the state. It will include back country and groomed trail rides, a “poker ride,’ a special dinner, winter carnival, door prizes and more.

Fairview Canyon will be the gateway to it all.

Brian Howarth, president of the Skyline Sno-Riders, the local snowmobiling organization that has twice been named “Snowmobile Club of the Year” by the Utah Snowmobiling Association, said Fairview was chosen for several reasons. It has some of the best trails in the entire country. It also has a paved canyon road that leads to a trail head that provides access to more than 50 miles of trails to the north at Skyline Drive and some 30 miles to the south to Joe’s Valley. There is also a paved parking lot and warming shelters.

The great access, coupled with the great snow and diversity in the riding terrain made it a prime choice, he said. For information on the state ride, contact Howarth at (435) 427-3620 or Darlene Mortensen at 427-3353. Information is also available on the websitewww.skylinesno-riders.com.

The ride comes on the heels of a story in a national newspaper that focused on the outdoor opportunities of another spot in Sanpete County, Skyline Drive.

Earlier this month, the New York Times printed an article on the sport of “snowkiting,” mentioning that one of the “hot spots” for the increasingly popular sport is Skyline Drive.

In addition, new radio and television advertisements will be drumming up even more enthusiasm for the region. The Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council has teamed up with KUTV outdoors reporter Doug Miller for a new marketing campaign aimed at spreading the word about the outdoor sports opportunities in Sanpete County. The ads focus on the fact that there are year-round options, including snowmobiling and skiing in the winter to boating, horseback riding and golf in the warmer months.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Secret’s Out: Sanpete County’s Outdoor Opportunities Are Second to None

DATE 12/22/2005 1:54 PMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Secret’s Out: Sanpete County’s Outdoor Opportunities Are Second to None

The secret it out: when the weather outside starts getting frightful, there is one thing that is sure to be delightful: outdoor recreation in Sanpete County.

“More and more people are definitely discovering how wonderful winter time is in Sanpete County,” says Monte Bona, a member of the Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council.

The fantastic snowmobiling routes, friendly people and outdoor sports opportunities are among the reasons that the county has been dubbed the “best outdoor recreation experience” in Utah. And the combination of fresh snow and access to fabulous routes keep people coming back year after year, local sporting enthusiasts say.

For starters, there is Skyline Drive, one of the state’s most beautiful scenic drives. Situated on the top of the Wasatch Plateau it gets an abundance of snow, it is slowly being recognized as one of the state’s best snowmobiling areas. The drive is 87 miles long and located above the 10,000-foot elevations means it offers some spectacular views.

Fairview Canyon, which is maintained during the winter months, is a popular an snowmobiling access point for The Energy Loop: Huntington and Eccles Canyons Scenic Byway. The loop, which splits off to either Scofield or Huntington, is also known as one of the most beautiful scenic drives in the country.

The Division of Parks and Recreation also grooms about 80 miles of access trails to the plateau out of Ephraim and Manti. It makes it convenient for the snowmobilers or cross country skiers is the access to nearby towns — Fairview, Mt. Pleasant, Moroni, Spring City, Ephraim and Manti.

Then there is the redesign of the Arapeen trail system. The routes, found primarily in the Manti LaSal National Forest, have been carefully marked and mapped to ensure that riders find their way around the 370 miles that make up the trail system. The redesign was several years in the making and includes bridges, culverts and water bars. In fact, the forest holds some of the state’s largest elk and deer herds.

One of the newest winter activities is snowboarding. Economic development officials say the snowmobiling and snow boarding are huge benefits for the county, contributing by means of people eating in local restaurants, staying in hotels and bed and breakfasts and visiting stores and shops. County officials are hoping to build on the reputation for excellent winter sports venues by getting visitors to spend more time in the local cities and towns visiting local attractions.

When the snow melts and the cold weather subsides, Sanpete County is still a popular spot for outdoor sports. For starters, the back country roads are open to vehicles, ATVs and bike riders. Rock climbing is also a big draw in the summer months with the county’s rugged cliffs that draw rock climbers from all over the country. In particular, Maple Canyon, located west of Moroni, offers climbers more than 80 established routes.

Fishing, horseback riding and camping are all other popular warm-weather sports.

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Fairview Chosen for ‘State Ride,’ Local Snowmobiling Enthusiasts Gearing Up

DATE 11/14/2005 4:29 PMFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Fairview Chosen for ‘State Ride,’ Local Snowmobiling Enthusiasts Gearing Up

Sanpete County’s Fairview Canyon has been selected as the location for the Utah Snowmobile Association’s annual “State Ride” to be held early next year.

The selection probably comes as no surprise to snowmobiling enthusiasts across the state. Not only does the Fairview region boast some of the best trails in the entire country, but it’s also home to award-winning “snowmobile families”, clubs and dealerships.

Brian Howarth knows a bit about the secrets of the region’s success. He is president of the Skyline Sno-Riders, the local snowmobiling organization that has twice been named “Snowmobile Club of the Year” by the Utah Snowmobiling Association. He also is one of the members of last year’s “Snowmobile Family of the Year,” another annual honor bestowed by the state association, and a long-time outdoors enthusiast.

To Howarth, who has been snowmobiling for more than 20 years, there is no better snowmobiling in the area than what is found in Fairview Canyon. “I think it’s because there is such diversity in the riding terrain. There are a lot of groomed trails, plus there is plenty of back country to explore,” he says.

Snowmobiling enthusiasts will get a good chance to experience both types of terrain during the annual Utah Snowmobile Association’s State Ride Feb. 24 and 25th. The event will also include a “poker ride”, special dinner, winter carnival and more, and Fairview Canyon will be the gateway to it all.

“It’s kind of a hidden secret,” Howarth says of the offerings provided by Fairview Canyon.

A paved canyon road leads to a trail head that provides access to more than 50 miles of trails to the north at Skyline Drive and some 30 miles to the south to Joe’s Valley. The combination of fresh snow and access to fabulous routes keep people coming back year after year.

“More and more people are finding out about it,” says Howarth, who moved to Fairview from Utah County about two years ago. His family had a cabin in the canyon and spent years snowmobiling in and around the area. After he married, he and his wife decided they wanted the “small town experience” and moved to the area permanently.

After moving there, Howarth and his entire family got involved in the Skyline Sno-Riders. Eventually, he became president and his mother, Darlene Mortensen, became secretary. Membership and interest has more than quadrupled since then, and the group now has some 130 members. “We are now the second largest club in the state,” Howarth says. “We are very family oriented, we have members of all ages and work hard to teach all of our members how to ride safe and respect the land on which they ride.”

Howarth’s family also started several charity events tied to snowmobiling that have raised food and funds for the local food bank. Last year, they raised 1,000 pounds of food. Their efforts are one of the reasons that Howarth, his wife, Miko, his mother, and dad, Clyde Mortensen, were named the state’s top snowmobiling family of the year in 2004.

Howarth and the Sno-Riders worked to establish a trailhead, including putting in a paved parking lot, as well as a warming shelter located about 15 miles away from the trail entrance that is kept well-stocked throughout the season, which typically runs from December through April.

The entire club also gets involved in community and charity events, such as “Operation Care Bear” that involved collecting stuffed animals to give to sheriff’s officers, fire and ambulance workers to pass on to children. During the off-season, the club sponsors other events such as trail clean ups, an “adopt a highway” program. Members also work with the local forest service, parks and recreation and avalanche control to improve and support the land and trails.

This year’s Snowmobile Family of the Year — Ron and Coreen Linton — are also members of the Skyline Sno-Riders.

In addition, Big Pine Sports, located at the mouth of Fairview Canyon, received last year’s “Dealer of the Year” award from the state organization. Owners Glen and Judy Zumwalt are known throughout Utah as the “unofficial source” for snowmobiling conditions in Utah. People call the store just about daily during the season for updates and conditions. Avid snowmobilers themselves, Glen is the past president of the Utah Snowmobile Association, while Judy handles the group’s public relations.

Indeed, Big Pine Sports, the Skyline Sno-Riders, and Howarth and Mortensen families have done a lot of bring notoriety to the canyon. Snowmobiling also has long been a huge benefit for Sanpete County, contributing by means of snowmobiler’s eating in local restaurants, staying in hotels and bed and breakfasts and visiting stores and shops.

Howarth is inviting all outdoor enthusiasts to see just what makes Fairview Canyon such a draw Feb. 24th and 25th during the annual state ride. It’s expected to attract people from all over the state. The event will include back country and groomed trail rides, a dinner, door prizes and more.

For dinner tickets or information, contact Howarth at (435) 427-3620 or Darlene Mortensen at 427-3353. Information is also available on the website www.skylinesno-riders.com .

# # #

For more information Contact:

Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Snowmobiler’s Delight in Sanpete County Offerings – Press Release 11/30/04

DATE 11/30/2004 6:29 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Snowmobiler’s Delight in Sanpete County Offerings

When the weather outside is frightful, snowmobiler’s know that one thing will soon be delightful: the trails in Sanpete County.The region boasts some of the best trails for snowmobiling in the entire country, and the combination of fresh snow and access to fabulous routes keep people coming back year after year, local sporting enthusiasts say.

Snowmobiling enthusiasts should be sure to visit the county this season and check out the Arapeen trail system. The routes, found primarily in the Manti LaSal national forest, have been carefully marked and mapped to ensure that riders find their way around the 370 miles that make up the trail system. The trail system was recently redesigned and includes bridges, culverts and water bars.

Another draw is Fairview Canyon. The paved canyon road leads to a trail head that provides access to more than 60 miles of trails to the north at Skyline Drive and some 30 miles to the south to Joe’s Valley.

Snowmobiling has long been a huge benefit for Sanpete County, contributing by means of snowmobiler’s eating in local restaurants, staying in our hotels and bed and breakfasts and visiting our stores and shops.

# # #

For more information Contact:Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502

Holiday Celebrations Scheduled in Sanpete County – Press Release 11/29/04

DATE 11/29/2004 6:29 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Holiday Celebrations Scheduled in Sanpete County

It is beginning to look a lot like Christmas in Sanpete County, with numerous holiday activities planned from now until the week before Christmas.We want people traveling down the Heritage Highway U.S. 89 to stop off in the cities and towns along the highway for an old-fashioned Christmas, says Monte Bona, a member of the Mt. Pleasant city council.Events are listed by date, time city and location. They are:

Thursday, Dec. 2

  • 4 to 9 p.m., Manti Holiday Home Show, to benefit the construction of a community swimming pool. Seven homes on display. Tickets are $5 in advance or $6 at the door and are available at the Manti City office or through participating businesses.
  • 7 p.m., performance by the singing group, Bar J Wranglers, at Snow College s Activity Center. Tickets are $9 in advance or $10 at the door. Family tickets (for up to six people) are $40. For information call 283-7253.
  • 8 p.m., performance of It s a Wonderful Life at the Ephraim Middle School. Admission is $2.
  • 5 to 9 p.m., Gunnison Home Tour sponsored by the Gunnison High School Drill Team. Nine homes are on display. Tickets are available at Valley Furniture or Rasmussen s Ace Hardware.

Friday, Dec. 3

  • 6 p.m., Ephraim City’s Parade of Lights down Main Street. Entertainment will be held prior to the parade starting at 4:30 p.m. at the City Building.
  • 5 to 9 p.m., Gunnison Home Tour sponsored by the Gunnison High School Drill Team. Nine homes are on display. Tickets are available at Valley Furniture or Rasmussen s Ace Hardware.

Saturday, Dec. 4

  • 2 to 8 p.m., Sanpete Valley Hospital s annual Holiday Home Show in the Fairview/Milburn area. Tickets are $5 and available at Beck s Home Furniture and the Sanpete Valley Hospital.

Thursday, Dec. 7.

  • 7:30 p.m., Christmas choral concert, Eccles Performing Arts Center, Snow College, presented by the Snow College Music Department. Tickets are $1 and proceeds benefit the Shop-With-A-Cop program.

Wednesday, Dec. 8

  • 7:30 p.m., LD Singers Christmas Concert, Ephraim LDS Institute. Free admission.

Thursday, Dec. 9

  • 7:30 p.m., performance by the Utah Symphony at Snow College’s Eccles Center for the Performing Arts. Snow College musical groups will perform prior to the symphony starting at 6:30 p.m. Building tours will also be held.

Friday, Dec. 9

  • 6:30 p.m., City of Mayfield Christmas Party, Mayfield LDS Ward. Santa Claus will visit and there will be entertainment by the Mop Heads. A pot luck dinner is planned. For information, call Dorothy Robertson, 528-3629 or Teri Robertson, 528-3663.
  • 7:30 p.m., LD Singers Christmas Concert, Ephraim LDS Institute. Free admission.

Saturday Dec. 11 and Sunday Dec. 12

  • 7:30 p.m. Snow College and the City of Ephraim present the annual performance of Handel s Messiah at the Eccles Performing Arts Center.

Wednesday, Dec. 15

  • 7 p.m. Ephraim Middle School holds Yule Candles, an annual candlelight ceremony, at the Snow College Eccles Performing Arts Center.

Thursday, Dec. 16

  • 7 p.m. Children’s chorus performance at the Snow College Eccles Performing Arts Center. Free admission.

Friday, Dec. 18

  • 2 p.m. annual Christmas draw in downtown Mt. Pleasant at the recreation center. Santa Claus will be in attendance. Tickets for the draw are free with every $5 purchase from participating local vendors. For information, call 462-2502.
  • 6 p.m., Fairview City’s Lights Parade. Santa Claus will visit and refreshments will be served after the parade at the City Hall. Call 427-3858 for information.

# # #

For more information Contact:Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502
 

Preserving “Main Streets” a Priority in Cities Along U.S. Highway 89 – Press Release 10/08/2004

DATE 10/08/2004 1:44 PM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

This is part of an occasional series by the Sanpete Country Travel and Utah Heritage Highway 89 Alliance on the people and places along U.S. Highway 89.

Preserving “Main Streets” a Priority in Cities Along U.S. Highway 89

  The cities and towns along U.S. Highway 89 are continuing their efforts to restore their historical Main Streets, with many of the cities making Main Street preservation projects a priority. As well, many of the local governments are making such projects part of their master plans, emphasizing that historical preservation is a key to economic success.Indeed, traveling along U.S. Highway 89 is like stepping back in time. Many of the buildings along the route have been lovingly preserved, restored and renovated. Most of the preservation efforts have been spearheaded by local citizens’ groups and supported by grants from private and state and federal government agencies, in coordination with the Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council.Here are highlights of some of the many important Main Street projects that have been completed or initiated in the region:FAIRVIEW
Fairview Museum of History and Art. The building was constructed as a school in 1900 of quarry-sandstone. It burned down in 1916 and was rebuilt in 1917. However, the roof design was significantly changed during the reconstruction. The Fairview Museum Corporation restored the building to its former glory. There was a complete structural reconstruction and profile-design restoration of the roof in 1999, which brought it back to its original appearance. The interior has also been refurbished as galleries.

Main Street: The Citizens’ Advisory Committee, coordinated by Mary Goodwin, worked to make improvements along the historical Main Street. This included renovated existing historic buildings, improving the downtown park, getting new businesses to locate downtown and planting trees and flowers.

MT. PLEASANT
Carnegie Library: Sanpete County is home to three of Utah s remaining 17 Carnegie Libraries, including Mt. Pleasant s library that was built in 1917 and designed by the Salt Lake City architecture firm of Ware & Treganza. The library anchors Mt. Pleasant s Main Street and the numerous the buildings that have already been restored as part on the city s ongoing effort to preserve its historical Main Street. Recently, Mt. Pleasant City was designated as a Preserve America community by First Lady Laura Bush. Historic Railroad Depot and Caboose: An 1890’s Denver Rio Grand Depot was restored and moved to the Heritage Village on U.S. Highway 89 in Mt. Pleasant. It serves as an information center for the Utah Heritage Highway Alliance and is also the cornerstone of the Heritage Village. The Utah Heritage Foundation recognized the restoration with an award last year. The depot is also an antique and heritage products store. There is also a historical caboose that doubles as a restaurant on the site. The caboose was donated by the Hogle Family through the Garfield Western Railway Company. Illusion Academy: This high tech center that houses a computer illustration business. It is located in Mt. Pleasant City’s old industrial arts building that was once part of Sanpete County’s high school. Owner Dean Kleven, a computer illustrator who has worked for Disney and Dream Works, creates designs that are used in children s books. He also produces high-tech digital imaging and three-dimensional graphics, such as the kind used to produce movies such as Toy Story. The building also double as a community classroom where free courses are offered on computer illustration, web design and the Internet.

SPRING CITY
  Historical Old School: The old school on Centre Street has proudly stood in downtown Spring City for more than 100 years. It graces the city council s letterhead and is prominently displayed on the city s logo. Built in 1899, it once housed both elementary and secondary students. It has not been used as a teaching institution since the 1950s. Most recently, it has served mainly as a storage facility for the school district and has deteriorated over the years. The two-and-a-half storey structure is now being restored and rehabilitated by the Friends of Historic Spring City with support from the National Parks Service’s Save America’s Treasures program.

FOUNTAIN GREEN Theatre & DUP Building: The 100-year-old theatre and dance hall was restored for use as a community center, where local artisans and craft makers can display their talents and wares. The structure is really two buildings: one side was used as a theater, the other, as a dance hall and later a cultural hall by the LDS church. The project was supported by the Fountain Green Heritage Committee, the Eccles Foundation, and local volunteers. Local volunteers also helped restore the Daughters of the Utah Pioneer Building. A former Bishop s warehouse, the structure was built in 1906. The building is now used by the DUP for its meetings and as a museum.

EPHRAIM
The Noyes Building, Snow College: The Noyes Building was built between 1899 and 1908 as the Sanpete Stake Academy, one of several academies built by the LDS church. The building houses classrooms, labs and offices and administrative offices for Snow College. The exterior of the building consists of handmade brick and local oolite limestone. The building s restoration included framing the historical formal entrance stairway by a new stone platform that continues around the base of the building to create a basement consisting of the first-floor classrooms.

Ephraim Co-op: A large stone structure, the Ephraim co-op was built in the late 1870s as a cooperative store and is now home to a well-known handicraft store and museum. These two structures are good examples of the kinds of buildings Ephraim hopes to improve and protect through its new master plan. The city recently approved a new plan that calls for maintaining historically important buildings along Main Street and in other sections of town.

MANTI
City Hall: Manti’s city hall is one of the oldest city halls remaining in Utah. It was built in the late 1870s. The building features Italianate details such as a low-pitched hipped roof and decorative bracketed eves. It is the only surviving example of this style of architecture in the county. It had been neglected and deteriorated over the years, but was restored by the Manti Historic Preservation Commission and Manti Destiny Committee with support from the Utah Division of State History. The building is being used as a visitor s centre, museum and reception hall. Carnegie Library: One of only 17 remaining Carnegie Libraries in Utah, the Manti Library was designed by Watkins and Birch, a Provo-based architectural firm that also designed several other library buildings.

Historic Manti House Inn: Run by Jennifer and Jason Nicholes, the renovated inn was built in the late 1800s and originally to provide housing for people working on the Manti LDS temple. building sat vacant for several years until it was turned into a bed and breakfast in 1985. Since that time, it has been a popular attraction for visitors to the Manti pageant in the summer, as well as to newlyweds and couples celebrating anniversaries. It also has two banquet halls that are popular places for wedding luncheons.

GUNNISON
Star Theater: The community group Save our Star is moving ahead with plans to buy the historical theatre located on Gunnison’s Main Street and restore it to its former glory. The theatre, which is listed on the National Registrar of Historic Places, is believed to be one of the last Beaux Arts-style theaters in the Western United States. Built in 1912 as the “Casino Theater,” it was one of several similar theatres built in the state around that time. Other structures include Ogden’s Egyptian Theater and the Capitol Theater in Salt Lake. The name was changed to the Star Theater in 1936. Restoring the theater is the first step in restoring heritage sections of Gunnison s Main Street.

MORONI
Moroni Opera House: The historical Moroni Opera house has been under restoration on and off since 1991. It is now complete, thanks to the efforts of a volunteer-run Moroni Heritage Development Commission with support from the George S. And Dolores Dore Eccles Foundation, National Heritage Foundation, Utah State Historical Society, and Community Impact Board. The building has an interesting history. It was built in 1891 after the town’s residents realized that people had talents and no place to perform them. In the 1930’s, it was converted into a feed processing plant for the turkey industry. A mill was later built on the site. The city eventually made restoring the opera house its Centennial Project and a volunteer group began applying for grants to help fund the effort. The opera house is used for dinner theaters, children’s theatrical performances, dance performances and community events.
###

For more information Contact:Monte Bona
Sanpete County Travel and Heritage Council
(435) 462-2502
Skip to content

On this website we use first or third-party tools that store small files (cookie) on your device. Cookies are normally used to allow the site to run properly (technical cookies), to generate navigation usage reports (statistics cookies) and to suitable advertise our services/products (profiling cookies). We can directly use technical cookies, but you have the right to choose whether or not to enable statistical and profiling cookies. Enabling these cookies, you help us to offer you a better experience.